Editorial Board

Policy and Strategy Advisory Board

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                                                            [display_name] => Ryan Evans
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                                                            [user_firstname] => William
                                                            [user_lastname] => Inboden
                                                            [nickname] => William Inboden
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                                                            [display_name] => William Inboden
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                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 20:45:58
                                                            [user_description] => William Inboden joined the LBJ School faculty at the University of Texas at Austin after many years of working as a policymaker in Washington, D.C., and directing a foreign policy think tank overseas. He is the William Powers, Jr. Executive Director of the Clements Center for National Security and a Distinguished Scholar at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law. He is also a National Intelligence Council associate and is on the CIA Director’s Historical Review Panel. He previously served as senior director for strategic planning on the National Security Council, he worked on the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff and he served as a congressional staff member. Inboden’s think-tank experience includes the American Enterprise Institute and running the London-based Legatum Institute. He is a Council on Foreign Relations life member and a contributing editor to Foreign Policy magazine, and his commentary has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Foreign Affairs, The Weekly Standard, NPR, CNN and BBC. His classes, Ethics & International Relations and Presidential Decision-Making in National Security, have been selected in recent years as the "Best Class in the LBJ School." His current research includes American grand strategy, a history of Reagan Administration national security policy, and a history of totalitarian ideologies and religious intolerance.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => Megan G.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Oprea
                                                            [nickname] => Megan
                                                            [user_nicename] => megan
                                                            [display_name] => Megan G. Oprea
                                                            [user_email] => mgoprea@gmail.com
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                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-09 06:48:55
                                                            [user_description] => Megan received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in French linguistic. Her dissertation explored how second-generation North African immigrants in France view French and Arabic, and how those views related to their national and religious identity.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => Van
                                                            [user_lastname] => Jackson
                                                            [nickname] => Van Jackson
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                                                            [display_name] => Van Jackson
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                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 20:47:49
                                                            [user_description] => Van Jackson is an associate editor at the Texas National Security Review, a senior lecturer in international relations at Victoria University of Wellington, and a global fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. He is the author of On the Brink: Trump, Kim, and the Threat of Nuclear War (Cambridge University Press, 2018). The views expressed are solely those of the author.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => Stephen
                                                            [user_lastname] => Tankel
                                                            [nickname] => stephen.tankel
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                                                            [display_name] => Stephen Tankel
                                                            [user_email] => stephen.tankel@warontherocks.com
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-03 14:21:57
                                                            [user_description] => Stephen Tankel is an associate professor at American University, an adjunct senior fellow at the Center for a New America Security, a senior editor and War on the Rocks, and the author of With Us and Against Us: How America’s Partners Help and Hinder the War on Terror.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => Galen
                                                            [user_lastname] => Jackson
                                                            [nickname] => Galen Jackson
                                                            [user_nicename] => galen-jackson
                                                            [display_name] => Galen Jackson
                                                            [user_email] => galen.jackson@tnsr.org
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                                                            [user_registered] => 2018-10-02 14:50:29
                                                            [user_description] => Galen Jackson is an assistant professor of political science at Williams College where he teaches courses in international security, nuclear security, American foreign policy, the Middle East in international politics, and international relations theory. His work has been published in Security
Studies, International Security, and the Journal of Cold War Studies. He is currently working on a project that examines the superpower diplomacy of the Arab-Israeli conflict between the June 1967 war and the 1979 Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty. He received his Ph.D. in political science
from UCLA in 2016 and became an associate editor at TNSR in 2018.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => Autumn
                                                            [user_lastname] => Brewington
                                                            [nickname] => Autumn Brewington
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                                                            [display_name] => Autumn Brewington
                                                            [user_email] => ddd@tnsr.org
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                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 20:51:18
                                                            [user_description] => Autumn Brewington is an editor at Lawfare and a freelance writer in Washington. She was an editor at the Washington Post from 2001 to 2014 and ran the Wall Street Journal’s Think Tank blog from 2014 through 2016. A graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism, she also edits for the Texas National Security Review.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => Francis J.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Gavin
                                                            [nickname] => Francis J Gavin
                                                            [user_nicename] => francis-j-gavin
                                                            [display_name] => Francis J. Gavin
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                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:55:44
                                                            [user_description] => Francis J. Gavin is the Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and the inaugural director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS. In 2013, Gavin was appointed the first Frank Stanton Chair in Nuclear Security Policy Studies and Professor of Political Science at MIT. Before joining MIT, he was the Tom Slick Professor of International Affairs and the Director of the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas. From 2005 until 2010, he directed The American Assembly’s multiyear, national initiative, The Next Generation Project: U.S. Global Policy and the Future of International Institutions. Gavin’s writings include Gold, Dollars, and Power: The Politics of International Monetary Relations, 1958-1971 (University of North Carolina Press, 2004) and Nuclear Statecraft: History and Strategy in America’s Atomic Age (Cornell University Press, 2012). 

He received a PhD and MA in History from the University of Pennsylvania, a Master of Studies in Modern European History from Oxford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Chicago. Gavin is an Associate of the Managing the Atom Program at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University, Senior Fellow of the Clements Program in History, Strategy, and Statecraft, a Distinguished Scholar at the Robert S. Strauss Center, a Senior Advisor to the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project at the Woodrow Wilson Center, and a life-member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => William
                                                            [user_lastname] => Inboden
                                                            [nickname] => William Inboden
                                                            [user_nicename] => william-inboden
                                                            [display_name] => William Inboden
                                                            [user_email] => aaa@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 20:45:58
                                                            [user_description] => William Inboden joined the LBJ School faculty at the University of Texas at Austin after many years of working as a policymaker in Washington, D.C., and directing a foreign policy think tank overseas. He is the William Powers, Jr. Executive Director of the Clements Center for National Security and a Distinguished Scholar at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law. He is also a National Intelligence Council associate and is on the CIA Director’s Historical Review Panel. He previously served as senior director for strategic planning on the National Security Council, he worked on the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff and he served as a congressional staff member. Inboden’s think-tank experience includes the American Enterprise Institute and running the London-based Legatum Institute. He is a Council on Foreign Relations life member and a contributing editor to Foreign Policy magazine, and his commentary has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Foreign Affairs, The Weekly Standard, NPR, CNN and BBC. His classes, Ethics & International Relations and Presidential Decision-Making in National Security, have been selected in recent years as the "Best Class in the LBJ School." His current research includes American grand strategy, a history of Reagan Administration national security policy, and a history of totalitarian ideologies and religious intolerance.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => Robert J.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Art
                                                            [nickname] => Robert Art
                                                            [user_nicename] => robert-art
                                                            [display_name] => Robert J. Art
                                                            [user_email] => eeee@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:57:45
                                                            [user_description] => Robert Art, the director of MIT's Seminar XXI Program, is Herter Professor of International Relations at Brandeis University and a senior fellow in the Security Studies Program at MIT's Center for International Studies. He has served as a consultant to the Secretary of Defense and the Central Intelligence Agency, and is currently a faculty associate of the National Intelligence Council. Professor Art's books include The TFX Decision: McNamara and the Military; Reorganizing America's Defense, with Samuel P. Huntington and Vincent Davis, eds.; U.S. Foreign Policy: The Search for a New Role with Seyom Brown, eds.; The United States and Coercive Diplomacy, with Patrick Cronin, eds.; Democracy and Counterterrorism, with Louise Richardson, eds.; A Grand Strategy for America; and America’s Grand Strategy and World Politics.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => Richard
                                                            [user_lastname] => Betts
                                                            [nickname] => Richard Betts
                                                            [user_nicename] => richard-betts
                                                            [display_name] => Richard Betts
                                                            [user_email] => ffff@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:58:39
                                                            [user_description] => Richard K. Betts is the Arnold A. Saltzman Professor of War and Peace Studies in the political science department, Director of the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, and Director of the International Security Policy program in the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He was Director of National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations for four years and is now an adjunct Senior Fellow there. Betts was a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution until 1990 and adjunct Lecturer at the Johns Hopkins University's Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.  He also served at different times on the Harvard faculty as Lecturer in Government and as Visiting Professor of Government. Born in 1947, he received his BA, MA, and PhD in Government from Harvard University.  

A former staff member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, the National Security Council, and the Mondale Presidential Campaign, Betts has been an occasional consultant to the National Intelligence Council and Departments of State and Defense, served on the Military Advisory Panel for three Directors of Central Intelligence in the 1990s and later on the External Advisory Board for the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, and was a member of the National Commission on Terrorism. He lectures frequently at schools such as the National War College, Foreign Service Institute, and service academies. He served briefly as an officer in the U.S. Army.

Betts' first book, Soldiers, Statesmen, and Cold War Crises (Harvard University Press, 1977) was issued in a second edition by Columbia University Press in 1991. He is author of two other Columbia University Press books: Enemies of Intelligence (2007) and American Force (2012); three books published by the Brookings Institution: Surprise Attack (1982), Nuclear Blackmail and Nuclear Balance (1987), and Military Readiness (1995); coauthor and editor of three other Brookings books: The Irony of Vietnam (1979), Nonproliferation and U.S. Foreign Policy (1980), and Cruise Missiles (1981); editor of Conflict After the Cold War, Fourth Edition (Pearson, 2013); and coeditor of Paradoxes of Strategic Intelligence (Cass, 2003). Betts has published numerous articles on foreign policy, military strategy, intelligence, conventional forces, nuclear weapons, arms trade, collective security, strategic issues in Asia and Europe, and other subjects in professional journals. His writings won five prizes, and he received the International Studies Association’s ISSS Distinguished Scholar Award in 2005 and MIT’s Doolittle Award in 2012.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => John
                                                            [user_lastname] => Bew
                                                            [nickname] => John Bew
                                                            [user_nicename] => john-bew
                                                            [display_name] => John Bew
                                                            [user_email] => gggg@tnsr.org
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                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:59:38
                                                            [user_description] => I am Professor in History and Foreign Policy at the War Studies Department at King’s College London, where I am leading a major new project called the Grand Strategy Programme. The core aim of the Grand Strategy Programme is knowledge transfer: to bring more historical and strategic expertise to statecraft, diplomacy and foreign policy. It will also investigate the origins and future of the idea of World Order, with the support of a grant from the Leverhulme Trust. (For more information contact maeve.ryan@kcl.ac.uk)
In 2015, I was awarded the Philip Leverhulme Prize for Politics and International Studies, which ‘recognises the achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising’. In 2013-14, I was the youngest ever holder of the Henry A. Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy at the John W. Kluge Center at the US Library of Congress. In 2014-15, I held a Leverhulme Trust Scholarship in order to complete my history of the concept of realpolitik. I was formerly co-Director of International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence, having arrived at King’s in 2010.
I am the author of five books and numerous academic articles, which are bound together by an interest in history and contemporary statecraft. My fifth book, Citizen Clem: A Life of Attlee (Riverrun and Oxford University Press), was published in September 2016 and has been described as ‘easily the best single-volume, cradle-to-grave life of Clement Attlee yet written’. My fourth book Realpolitik: A History, was published by Oxford University Press in January 2016, and was widely reviewed widely in the international media including the Financial Times, Prospect, New Statesman, National Interest and Wall Street Journal, as well as the top peer-reviewed journals in the field.
My third book, Castlereagh: Enlightenment, War & Tyranny (Oxford University Press), was the lead review in the Times Literary Supplement, and a book of the year in The Wall Street Journal, The Spectator, Sunday Telegraph, Total Politics, and BBC Parliament’s Booktalk. Previous books include a co-written work, Talking to Terrorists: Making Peace in Northern Ireland and the Basque Country (Columbia University Press, 2009), which was named in Foreign Policy magazine’s Global Thinkers Book Club and as the best in its category in the journal, Perspectives on Terrorism.
I am a contributing writer at the New Statesman, and cover the release of state papers for the Irish Times. I have also written for the Times Literary Supplement, American Interest, National Interest, New Republic, Literary Review, and History Today. I am currently working with the think tank Policy Exchange, where I am leading a new academic commission examining the question of Britain in the World. The project was launched by the UK Secretary of State for Defence in May 2016 and aims to bring more academic expertise into the policy making process.
From 2007-10, I was Lecturer in Modern British History, Harris Fellow and Director of Studies at Peterhouse, Cambridge University, where I was previously a Junior Research Fellow. I completed my education at Pembroke College, Cambridge where I was a Foundation Scholar and a Thornton Scholar and attained a first class BA in History. I won the Member’s Prize for the best MPhil in Historical Studies, before going on to complete my PhD in 2006.
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                                                            [ID] => 88
                                                            [user_firstname] => Nigel
                                                            [user_lastname] => Biggar
                                                            [nickname] => Nigel Biggar
                                                            [user_nicename] => nigel-biggar
                                                            [display_name] => Nigel Biggar
                                                            [user_email] => tt@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:51:56
                                                            [user_description] => Nigel Biggar holds a B.A. (Hons) in Modern History from the University of Oxford; a Master of Christian Studies from Regent College, Vancouver, Canada; and an M.A. in Religious Studies, and a Ph.D. in Christian Theology, from the University of Chicago.

Among his current research interests are: the ethics of nationalism and empire; the ethics of individual rights and of jurisprudence about them; ‘just war’ reasoning; the principle of double effect and the ethics of killing; the concept of proportionality; the moral vocation of universities; and the relationship between (Christian) religious concepts and moral life.
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                                                            [ID] => 144
                                                            [user_firstname] => Philip
                                                            [user_lastname] => Bobbitt
                                                            [nickname] => Philip Bobbitt
                                                            [user_nicename] => philip-bobbitt
                                                            [display_name] => Philip Bobbitt
                                                            [user_email] => 5b@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2018-02-15 14:52:21
                                                            [user_description] => Philip Bobbitt is Herbert Wechsler Professor of Federal Jurisprudence and Director of the Center on National Security, Columbia Law School and Distinguished Senior Lecturer at the University of Texas.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => Hal
                                                            [user_lastname] => Brands
                                                            [nickname] => Hal.Brands
                                                            [user_nicename] => hal-brands
                                                            [display_name] => Hal Brands
                                                            [user_email] => hal@tsnr.com
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-08-27 10:08:13
                                                            [user_description] => Hal Brands is a Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor of Global Affairs at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He is the author or editor of several books, including Making the Unipolar Moment: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Rise of the Post-Cold War Order (2016), What Good is Grand Strategy? Power and Purpose in American Statecraft from Harry S. Truman to George W. Bush (2014), Latin America's Cold War (2010), From Berlin to Baghdad: America's Search for Purpose in the Post-Cold War World (2008), and The Power of the Past: History and Statecraft (co-edited with Jeremi Suri, 2015).

He was a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow from 2015 to 2016. He has also consulted with a range of government offices and agencies in the intelligence and national security communities.

He received his BA from Stanford University (2005) and his PhD from Yale University (2009). He previously worked as an assistant and associate professor at Duke University's Sanford School of Public Policy, and as a researcher at the Institute for Defense Analyses.
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                                                            [user_firstname] => Joshua W.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Busby
                                                            [nickname] => Josh Busby
                                                            [user_nicename] => josh-busby
                                                            [display_name] => Joshua W. Busby
                                                            [user_email] => z@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-30 16:23:07
                                                            [user_description] => Joshua Busby is a distinguished scholar at the Strauss Center, nonresident fellow with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and a senior research fellow at the Center for Climate & Security. Dr. Busby has published widely on climate change, global health, transnational advocacy movements and U.S. foreign policy for various think tanks and academic journals, including International Security, International Studies Quarterly, Security Studies and Perspectives on Politics. His first book, “Moral Movements and Foreign Policy,” was published by Cambridge University Press in 2010. His second book, “AIDS Drugs for All: Social Movements and Market Transformations,” with co-author Ethan Kapstein, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2013 and won the 2014 Don K. Price Award (the American Political Science Association’s award for the best book on science, technology and environmental politics). He was one of the lead researchers on a five-year, $7.6 million project funded by the Department of Defense called “Climate Change and African Political Stability” (CCAPS). He is the principal investigator of another DOD-funded project, “Complex Emergencies and Political Stability in Asia” (CEPSA) — a three-year, $1.9 million grant. Dr. Busby is a life member in the Council on Foreign Relations. He received his Ph.D. in political science in 2004 from Georgetown University.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [9] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 53
                                                            [user_firstname] => Robert
                                                            [user_lastname] => Chesney
                                                            [nickname] => Robert Chesney
                                                            [user_nicename] => robert-chesney
                                                            [display_name] => Robert Chesney
                                                            [user_email] => hhhh@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:03:20
                                                            [user_description] => Bobby Chesney holds the James Baker Chair and also serves as the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Texas School of Law. In addition, he is the Director of the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, a University-wide research unit bridging across disciplines to improve understanding of international security issues.

In 2009, Professor Chesney served in the Justice Department in connection with the Detention Policy Task Force created by Executive Order 13493. He also previously served the Intelligence Community as an associate member of the Intelligence Science Board and as a member of the Advanced Technology Board. In addition to his current positions at the University of Texas, he is  a member of the American Law Institute, and a senior editor for the Journal of National Security Law & Policy, and a former non-resident Senior Fellow of the Brookings Institution.

Professor Chesney is a co-founder and contributor to www.lawfareblog.com, the leading source for analysis, commentary, and news relating to law and national security. In addition to his blogging at Lawfare, those interested in national security law should consider following Professor Chesney on Twitter (@bobbychesney) as well as subscribing to the National Security Law Podcast (which he co-hosts with his colleague Steve Vladeck). Professor Chesney's scholarship focuses on U.S. national security policies and institutions, encompassing both domestic and international law issues. His articles may be downloaded from SSRN here.

Professor Chesney is a magna cum laude graduate of both Texas Christian University and Harvard Law School. After law school he clerked for the Honorable Lewis A. Kaplan of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and the Honorable Robert D. Sack of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He then practiced with the firm Davis Polk & Wardwell in New York (litigation), before beginning his academic career with Wake Forest University School of Law. There he received a teacher of the year award from the student body in one year, and from the school's dean in another. In 2008 he came to the University of Texas School of Law as a visiting professor, and then joined UT on a permanent basis in 2009. He became the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in 2011.

Professor Chesney teaches a variety of courses, including: Constitutional Law, National Security Law, Foundations of Cybersecurity: Law, Institutions, and Policy; Law of the Intelligence Community; History of U.S. Counterterrorism Law & Policy: 1970 to Present; Evidence, Civil Procedure, and an array of seminars. He is from San Antonio.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [10] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 54
                                                            [user_firstname] => Eliot
                                                            [user_lastname] => Cohen
                                                            [nickname] => Eliot Cohen
                                                            [user_nicename] => eliot-cohen
                                                            [display_name] => Eliot Cohen
                                                            [user_email] => iiii@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:03:48
                                                            [user_description] => Eliot Cohen is Robert E. Osgood Professor at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He directs the strategic studies program at SAIS and the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies, which he founded. He has twice won the SAIS Excellence in Teaching Award and has extensive experience in executive education, including serving as an adjunct professor at the US Army War College.

A 1977 graduate of Harvard College, he received his PhD there in political science in 1982.  From 1982 to 1985 he was Assistant Professor of Government at Harvard, and Assistant Dean of Harvard College. In 1985 he became a member of the Strategy Department of the United States Naval War College. In February 1990 he joined the Policy Planning Staff of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and in July of that year he was appointed professor of strategic studies at SAIS.

From April 2007 through January 2009 he served as Counselor of the Department of State. A principal officer of the Department, he had special responsibility for advising the Secretary on Iraq, Afghanistan, Iran, Pakistan, and Russia, as well as general strategic issues. He represented the Department of State in interagency coordination with senior National Security Council staff, Department of Defense, and intelligence community officials on a number of issues, including the Syrian/North Korean reactor crisis of 2007.

Eliot Cohen is the author of The Big Stick: The Limits of Soft Power and the Necessity of Military Force (2017), Conquered into Liberty: Two Centuries of Battles along the Great Warpath that made the American Way of War (2011), Supreme Command:  Soldiers, Statesmen, and Leadership in Wartime  (2002). His other books are Commandos and Politicians (1978) and Citizens and Soldiers (1985). He is, as well, co-author of Military Misfortunes: The Anatomy of Failure in War (1990), Revolution in Warfare? Air Power in the Persian Gulf (1995), and Knives, Tanks, and Missiles: Israel’s Security Revolution (1998), and co-editor of Strategy in the Contemporary World (2002) and War over Kosovo  (2001). From 1991 to 1993 he directed and edited the official study of air power in the 1991 war with Iraq. For his leadership of The Gulf War Air Power Survey, which included eleven book-length reports, he received the Air Force’s decoration for exceptional civilian service. His articles have appeared in numerous scholarly and popular journals, he publishes often in national newspapers such as the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and New York Times and is a contributing editor at The Atlantic.

In 1982 he was commissioned as a military intelligence officer in the United States Army Reserve. In the past he has served as a member of the Defense Policy Advisory Board and the National Security Advisory Panel of the National Intelligence Council, and of the Council of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, and of the Committee on Studies of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is an Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [11] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 55
                                                            [user_firstname] => Audrey
                                                            [user_lastname] => Kurth Cronin
                                                            [nickname] => Audrey Kurth Cronin
                                                            [user_nicename] => audrey-kurth-cronin
                                                            [display_name] => Audrey Kurth Cronin
                                                            [user_email] => jjjj@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:05:04
                                                            [user_description] => Audrey Kurth Cronin joined the faculty of American University’s School of International Service in August 2016. Her previous position was Director of the Center for Security Policy Studies, and Director of the International Security Program at George Mason University. Before that, she was a faculty member and director of the core course on War and Statecraft at the U.S. National War College (2007-2011). Professor Cronin’s career has combined academic positions and government service. She came to the war college from Oxford University (Nuffield College), where she was Academic Director of Studies for the Oxford/Leverhulme Programme on the Changing Character of War (2005-2007). Before that, she was Specialist in Terrorism at the Congressional Research Service, advising Members of Congress in the aftermath of 9/11. She has also served in the U.S. Executive branch, including in the Office of the Secretary of Defense for Policy; the Office of the Secretary of the Navy; and the American Embassy in Moscow. She often consults at senior levels of the U.S. government. Professor Cronin is widely published on strategy and nonstate actors. Her last book, which The New Yorker called "a landmark study," was How Terrorism Ends: Understanding the Decline and Demise of Terrorist Campaigns (Princeton University Press). It was recently translated into Chinese and Arabic. She regularly writes for academic and general interest audiences, in a range of journals including International Security and Foreign Affairs, as well as on-line venues and blogs. She also does media interviews for prominent national and international outlets. In 2015 she was named Australia’s Keogh Chair and traveled throughout the country speaking about the future of conflict, innovation and technology. Professor Cronin has repeatedly spoken at the World Economic Forum (where she was Chairman of the Global Agenda Council on Terrorism), the Council on Foreign Relations (where she is a member), the IISS (London), and many other national and international venues. Her forthcoming book, to be published by Oxford University Press in 2019, places military and terrorist innovation into broad historical context, then explores the risks and opportunities of 21st century emerging technologies.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [12] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 56
                                                            [user_firstname] => Theo
                                                            [user_lastname] => Farrell
                                                            [nickname] => Theo Farrell
                                                            [user_nicename] => theo-farrell
                                                            [display_name] => Theo Farrell
                                                            [user_email] => llll@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:06:17
                                                            [user_description] => Theo Farrell is professor and executive dean of law, humanities, and the arts at the University of Wollongong, Australia. He was previously professor of war in the modern world and head of the Department of War Studies at King’s College London. He is a fellow of the U.K. Academy of Social Sciences and former president of the British International Studies Association.

Professor Farrell is the author of Unwinnable: Britain’s War in Afghanistan, 2001–2014 (Penguin Random House, 2017), which was shortlisted for the RUSI Duke of Wellington Medal for Military History and the British Army Military Book of the Year. It was also named as a book of the year in the Times and the Evening Standard.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [13] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 57
                                                            [user_firstname] => Peter D.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Feaver
                                                            [nickname] => Peter D Feaver
                                                            [user_nicename] => peter-d-feaver
                                                            [display_name] => Peter D. Feaver
                                                            [user_email] => mmmm@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:06:58
                                                            [user_description] => Peter D. Feaver (Ph.D., Harvard, 1990) is a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Duke University. He is Director of the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS) and also Director of the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy (AGS). Feaver is author of Armed Servants: Agency, Oversight, and Civil-Military Relations (Harvard Press, 2003) and of Guarding the Guardians: Civilian Control of Nuclear Weapons in the United States (Cornell University Press, 1992). He is co-author, with Christopher Gelpi and Jason Reifler, of Paying the Human Costs of War (Princeton University Press, 2009), co-author, with Susan Wasiolek and Anne Crossman, of Getting the Most Out of College (Ten Speed Press, 2008), and co-author, with Christopher Gelpi, of Choosing Your Battles: American Civil-Military Relations and the Use of Force (Princeton University Press, 2004). He is co-editor, with Richard H. Kohn, of Soldiers and Civilians: The Civil-Military Gap and American National Security (MIT Press, 2001). He has published numerous other monographs, scholarly articles, book chapters, and policy pieces on American foreign policy, public opinion, nuclear proliferation, civil-military relations, information warfare, and U.S. national security. He is a member of the Aspen Strategy Group and blogs at Elephants in the Room on ForeignPolicy.com. In 1993-94, Feaver served as Director for Defense Policy and Arms Control on the National Security Council at the White House where his responsibilities included the national security strategy review, counterproliferation policy, regional nuclear arms control, and other defense policy issues. From June 2005 to July 2007, Feaver was on leave to be Special Advisor for Strategic Planning and Institutional Reform on the National Security Council Staff at the White House where his responsibilities included the national security strategy, regional strategy reviews, and other political-military issues.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [14] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 93
                                                            [user_firstname] => Rosemary
                                                            [user_lastname] => Foot
                                                            [nickname] => Rosemary Foot
                                                            [user_nicename] => rosemary-foot
                                                            [display_name] => Rosemary Foot
                                                            [user_email] => zz@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-23 16:49:24
                                                            [user_description] => Rosemary Foot was elected to an Emeritus Fellowship of St Antony’s College in October 2014. She is a Senior Research Fellow at Oxford’s Department of Politics and International Relations and a Research Associate at the Oxford China Centre. Previously Professor of International Relations, and the John Swire Senior Research Fellow at St Antony’s College, she has been a Fellow of the College since 1990. She was Senior Tutor from 2003-2005, and was Acting Warden of the College from January-October 2012. In 2014, she held the Visiting Sir Howard Kippenberger Chair in Strategic Studies at the University of Victoria in Wellington, New Zealand, and a Visiting Fellowship at the Nobel Institute, Oslo, Norway.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [15] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 58
                                                            [user_firstname] => Taylor
                                                            [user_lastname] => Fravel
                                                            [nickname] => Taylor Fravel
                                                            [user_nicename] => taylor-fravel
                                                            [display_name] => Taylor Fravel
                                                            [user_email] => nnnn@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:07:48
                                                            [user_description] => M. Taylor Fravel is the Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science and member of the Security Studies Program at MIT. Taylor is a graduate of Middlebury College and Stanford University, where he received his PhD. He has been a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University, a Predoctoral Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, a Fellow with the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program and a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He also has graduate degrees from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the International Studies Quarterly, Security Studies, Journal of Strategic Studies, and The China Quarterly, and is a member of the board of directors for the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations. He is also the Principal Investigator of the Maritime Awareness Project.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [16] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 59
                                                            [user_firstname] => Lawrence
                                                            [user_lastname] => Freedman
                                                            [nickname] => Lawrence Freedman
                                                            [user_nicename] => lawrence-freedman
                                                            [display_name] => Lawrence Freedman
                                                            [user_email] => oooo@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:09:43
                                                            [user_description] => Sir Lawrence Freedman has been Professor of War Studies at King's College London since 1982, and Vice-Principal since 2003. He was educated at Whitley Bay Grammar School and the Universities of Manchester, York and Oxford. Before joining King's he held research appointments at Nuffield College Oxford, IISS and the Royal Institute of International Affairs. Elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1995 and awarded the CBE (Commander of the British Empire) in 1996, he was appointed Official Historian of the Falklands Campaign in 1997.

Freedman was awarded the KCMG (Knight Commander of St Michael and St George) in 2003. He was appointed in June 2009 to serve as a member of the official inquiry into Britain and the 2003 Iraq War.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [17] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 60
                                                            [user_firstname] => James
                                                            [user_lastname] => Goldgeier
                                                            [nickname] => James Goldgeier
                                                            [user_nicename] => james-goldgeier
                                                            [display_name] => James Goldgeier
                                                            [user_email] => pppp@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:11:14
                                                            [user_description] => James Goldgeier is a visiting senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and professor of international relations at the School of International Service at American University, where he served as dean from 2011 to 2017. He holds the 2018-19 Library of Congress U.S.-Russia Chair at the John W. Kluge Center. Previously, he was a professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University, where from 2001 to 2005 he directed the Elliott School’s Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies. He also taught at Cornell University and he has held a number of public policy appointments, including director for Russian, Ukrainian and Eurasian affairs on the National Security Council staff, Whitney Shepardson senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, Henry A. Kissinger chair at the Library of Congress, and Edward Teller national fellow at the Hoover Institution. In addition, he has held appointments at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Brookings Institution, and the Center for International Security and Cooperation.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [18] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 90
                                                            [user_firstname] => Michael J.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Green
                                                            [nickname] => Michael J Green
                                                            [user_nicename] => michael-j-green
                                                            [display_name] => Michael J. Green
                                                            [user_email] => vv@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:54:09
                                                            [user_description] => Michael Jonathan Green is senior vice president for Asia and Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and director of Asian Studies at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He served on the staff of the National Security Council (NSC) from 2001 through 2005, first as director for Asian affairs with responsibility for Japan, Korea, Australia, and New Zealand, and then as special assistant to the president for national security affairs and senior director for Asia, with responsibility for East Asia and South Asia. Before joining the NSC staff, he was a senior fellow for East Asian security at the Council on Foreign Relations, director of the Edwin O. Reischauer Center and the Foreign Policy Institute and assistant professor at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University, research staff member at the Institute for Defense Analyses, and senior adviser on Asia in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He also worked in Japan on the staff of a member of the National Diet.

Dr. Green is also a nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute in Sydney, Australia, a distinguished scholar at the Asia Pacific Institute in Tokyo, and professor by special appointment at Sophia University in Tokyo. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Aspen Strategy Group, the America Australia Leadership Dialogue, the advisory boards of Radio Free Asia and the Center for a New American Security, and the editorial boards of the Washington Quarterly and the Journal of Unification Studies in Korea. He also serves as a trustee at the Asia Foundation, senior adviser at the Asia Group, and associate of the U.S. Intelligence Community. Dr. Green has authored numerous books and articles on East Asian security, including most recently, By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783 (Columbia University Press, 2017). He received his master’s and doctoral degrees from SAIS and did additional graduate and postgraduate research at Tokyo University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his bachelor’s degree in history from Kenyon College with highest honors. He holds a black belt in Iaido (sword) and has won international prizes on the great highland bagpipe.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [19] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 87
                                                            [user_firstname] => Kelly M.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Greenhill
                                                            [nickname] => Kelly M Greenhill
                                                            [user_nicename] => kelly-m-greenhill
                                                            [display_name] => Kelly M. Greenhill
                                                            [user_email] => ss@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:50:06
                                                            [user_description] => Kelly M. Greenhill's research focuses on foreign and defense policy; the politics of information; the use of military force; and what are frequently called "new security challenges," including civil wars, (counter-) insurgencies, the use of migration as a weapon, and international crime as a challenge to domestic governance. In addition to her Ph.D. from M.I.T., Greenhill holds an S.M. from M.I.T., a C.S.S. from Harvard University, and a B.A. (with distinction and highest honors) from the University of California at Berkeley. Outside of the Department, Greenhill serves as Research Fellow and as Chair of the Conflict, Security and Public Policy Working Group at Harvard University's Belfer Center and as Associate Editor of the journal International Security.

Greenhill is author of Weapons of Mass Migration: Forced Displacement, Coercion and Foreign Policy (Cornell Studies in Security Affairs), which won the 2011 International Studies Association's Best Book of the Year Award; and co-author and co-editor (with P. Andreas) of Sex, Drugs and Body Counts: The Politics of Numbers in Global Crime and Conflict (Cornell University Press); (with R. Art) of the eighth edition of The Use of Force: Military Power and International Politics (R&L); and (with P. Krause) of Coercion: The Power to Hurt in International Politics (Oxford University Press, in press). Her research has also appeared in a variety of other venues, including the journals International Security, International Studies Quarterly, Security Studies, Civil Wars, European Law Journal and International Migration; media outlets such as the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Foreign Affairs and the British Broadcasting Company; and in briefs prepared for argument before the U.S. Supreme Court and for use by other organs of the U.S. government. She is currently completing a new book, a cross-national study that explores why, when, and under what conditions, "extra-factual" sources of political information—such as rumors, conspiracy theories, myths and propaganda—materially influence the development and conduct of states' foreign and defense policies. The book is provisionally entitled Fear and Present Danger: Extra-factual Sources of Threat Conception and Proliferation.

Greenhill's research has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the Social Science Research Council, the MacArthur Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the Eisenhower Foundation and the Neubauer Foundation. In October 2017, it was announced that Greenhill was chosen as winner of the 2018 ISSS Emerging Scholar Award (to be bestowed in April 2018). Outside of academia, Greenhill has served as a consultant to the Ford Foundation, the World Bank and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR); as a defense program analyst for the U.S. Department of Defense; and as an economic policy intern in the Office of then Senator John F. Kerry. She sits on the editorial boards of Sage Publications and of the journals Security Studies, the Journal of Global Security Studies and the Texas National Security Review. Before coming to Tufts, Greenhill held pre- or post-doctoral fellowships at Harvard University's Olin Institute for Strategic Studies and Belfer Center, at Stanford University's Center for International Security and Cooperation, and at Columbia University's Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [20] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 101
                                                            [user_firstname] => Beatrice
                                                            [user_lastname] => Heuser
                                                            [nickname] => Beatrice Heuser
                                                            [user_nicename] => beatrice-heuser
                                                            [display_name] => Beatrice Heuser
                                                            [user_email] => l@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-24 18:21:02
                                                            [user_description] => Beatrice Heuser is a graduate of the universities of London (BA from Bedford College; MA from the LSE) and Oxford (St Antony’s College; St John’s College, graduated with DPhil). She holds a higher doctorate (Habilitation) from the University of Marburg. She has taught at King’s College London at the Department of War Studies, and at the University of Reading, and has taught at or held visiting professorships at several Parisian universities, the universities of Reims and Potsdam, at Sciences Po’ Paris and Reims, at the University of Rome III, at the Bundeswehr University near Munich and at the Russian Foreign Ministry’s university MGIMO. She spent a year at NATO Headquarters as a Consultant/Intern, and has worked as Director of Studies of the German Bundeswehr’s military history research office. She has been affiliated to/currently serving on academic advisory boards of several research institutes, including the French Institute of International Affairs (IFRI), the Royal United Services Institute, Chatham House (RIIA), the German Institute for Contemporary History, and the French government’s strategic studies think tank IRSEM.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [21] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 61
                                                            [user_firstname] => Michael C.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Horowitz
                                                            [nickname] => Michael C Horowitz
                                                            [user_nicename] => michael-c-horowitz
                                                            [display_name] => Michael C. Horowitz
                                                            [user_email] => qqqq@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:12:11
                                                            [user_description] => Michael C. Horowitz is a professor of political science and the associate director of Perry World House at the University of Pennsylvania. He recently received the 2017 Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, presented annually to a scholar under age 40 who is judged to have made the most significant contribution to the study of international relations and peace research. Professor Horowitz is the co-author of the book, Why Leaders Fight, and his award-winning first book, The Diffusion of Military Power: Causes and Consequences for International Politics. His research interests include technology and global politics, military innovation, the role of leaders in international politics, and forecasting. He has published in a wide array of peer reviewed journals, as well as more popular outlets such as the New York Times and Politico. Professor Horowitz previously worked for the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy in the Department of Defense. He is affiliated with the Foreign Policy Research Institute, the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and the Center for a New American Security. He is also a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He has held fellowships at the Weatherhead Center, Olin Institute, and Belfer Center at Harvard, where he received his PhD in Government. Professor Horowitz received his BA in political science from Emory University. You can find him on Twitter @mchorowitz.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [22] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 62
                                                            [user_firstname] => Richard H.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Immerman
                                                            [nickname] => Richard H Immerman
                                                            [user_nicename] => richard-h-immerman
                                                            [display_name] => Richard H. Immerman
                                                            [user_email] => rrrr@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:14:02
                                                            [user_description] => Richard H. Immerman is Edward Buthusiem Distinguished Faculty Fellow in History and Marvin Wachman Director of the Center for the Study of Force and Diplomacy at Temple University. The recipient of Temple’s Paul Eberman Faculty Research Award, the University of Hawaii’s Board of Regents Excellence in Research Award, and a former president of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations, his most recent books are Empire for Liberty; The Hidden Hand; and Understanding the U.S. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Immerman served as Assistant Deputy Director of National Intelligence, held the Francis W. De Serio Chair in Strategic Intelligence at the United States Army War College, and currently chairs the State Department's Historical Advisory Committee.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [23] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 91
                                                            [user_firstname] => Robert
                                                            [user_lastname] => Jervis
                                                            [nickname] => Robert Jervis
                                                            [user_nicename] => robert-jervis
                                                            [display_name] => Robert Jervis
                                                            [user_email] => sss1@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-23 00:02:44
                                                            [user_description] => Robert Jervis (Ph.D., California at Berkeley, 1968) is the Adlai E. Stevenson Professor of International Politics and has been a member of the Columbia political science department since 1980. He has also held professorial appointments at the University of California at Los Angeles (1974-1980) and Harvard University (1968-1974). In 2000-2001, he served as President of the American Political Science Association. Professor Jervis is co-editor of the "Cornell Studies in Security Affairs," a series published by Cornell University Press, and a member of numerous editorial review boards for scholarly journals. His publications include Perception and Misperception in International Politics, The Meaning of the Nuclear Revolution, System Effects: Complexity in Political and Social Life, American Foreign Policy in a New Era, and Why Intelligence Fails: Lessons from the Fall of the Shah and Iraqi WMD, and several edited volumes and numerous articles in scholarly journals. His latest book is How Statesmen Think: The Psychology of International Politics.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [24] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 42
                                                            [user_firstname] => Colin
                                                            [user_lastname] => Kahl
                                                            [nickname] => Colin Kahl
                                                            [user_nicename] => colin-kahl
                                                            [display_name] => Colin Kahl
                                                            [user_email] => vvv@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:22:43
                                                            [user_description] => Colin H. Kahl is co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation, the inaugural Steven C. Házy Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and a Professor, by courtesy, in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. He is also a Strategic Consultant to the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement.

From October 2014 to January 2017, he was Deputy Assistant to the President and National Security Advisor to the Vice President. In that position, he served as a senior advisor to President Obama and Vice President Biden on all matters related to U.S. foreign policy and national security affairs, and represented the Office of the Vice President as a standing member of the National Security Council Deputies’ Committee. From February 2009 to December 2011, Dr. Kahl was the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for the Middle East at the Pentagon. In this capacity, he served as the senior policy advisor to the Secretary of Defense for Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Yemen, and six other countries in the Levant and Persian Gulf region. In June 2011, he was awarded the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service by Secretary Robert Gates. 

From 2007 to 2017 (when not serving in the U.S. government), Dr. Kahl was an assistant and associate professor in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. From 2007 to 2009 and 2012 to 2014, he was also a Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), a nonpartisan Washington, DC-based think tank. From 2000 to 2007, he was an assistant professor of political science at the University of Minnesota. In 2005-2006, Dr. Kahl took leave from the University of Minnesota to serve as a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, where he worked on issues related to counterinsurgency, counterterrorism, and responses to failed states. In 1997-1998, he was a National Security Fellow at the John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University.

Current research projects include a book analyzing American grand strategy in the Middle East in the post-9/11 era. A second research project focuses on the implications of emerging technologies on strategic stability.

He has published numerous articles on international security and U.S. foreign and defense policy in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, International Security, the Los Angeles Times, Middle East Policy, the National Interest, the New Republic, the New York Times, Politico, the Washington Post, and the Washington Quarterly, as well as several reports for CNAS.

His previous research analyzed the causes and consequences of violent civil and ethnic conflict in developing countries, focusing particular attention on the demographic and natural resource dimensions of these conflicts. His book on the subject, States, Scarcity, and Civil Strife in the Developing World, was published by Princeton University Press in 2006, and related articles and chapters have appeared in International Security, the Journal of International Affairs, and various edited volumes.

Dr. Kahl received his B.A. in political science from the University of Michigan (1993) and his Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University (2000).
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [25] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 64
                                                            [user_firstname] => Jonathan
                                                            [user_lastname] => Kirshner
                                                            [nickname] => Jonathan Kirshner
                                                            [user_nicename] => jonathan-kirshner
                                                            [display_name] => Jonathan Kirshner
                                                            [user_email] => tttt@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:16:51
                                                            [user_description] => My research and teaching interests focus on International Relations, political economy (especially macroeconomics and money), and politics and film. I am currently pursuing projects on Classical Realism, the international political implications of the financial crisis and its aftermath, and the politics of mid-century cinema. My CV can be accessed here and links to many of my publications can be found here. Recent books include American Power after the Financial Crisis, and Hollywood’s Last Golden Age: Politics, Society and the Seventies Film in America. My first book, Currency and Coercion: The Political Economy of International Monetary Power explored how states manipulate international monetary relations to advance security-related goals. Another book, Appeasing Bankers: Financial Caution on the Road to War, illustrated how financial interests (such as banks) and international financial markets can shape and constrain states’ grand strategies and influence decisions about war and peace. Appeasing Bankers won the best book award from the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association. 

I am the editor of the volumes Globalization and National Security, and Money Orders: Ambiguous Economics, Ubiquitous Politics. (Published in 2003, Monetary Orders features several chapters that anticipate key issues that would become central to understanding the global financial crisis of 2007-8; my papers on Keynes and on macroeconomic politics more generally engage these themes as well.) With Eric Helleiner, I am the co-editor of the multi-disciplinary book series, “Cornell Studies in Money,” as well as the books The Great Wall of Money: Power and Politics in China’s International Monetary Relations, and The Future of the Dollar. 

I served as director of Cornell’s Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies from 2007 to 2015, and previously chaired the Economics and National Security Program at the Olin Institute of Strategic Studies at Harvard. From Cornell I have received the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Scholarship, and the Stephen and Margery Russell Distinguished Teaching Award.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [26] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 65
                                                            [user_firstname] => James
                                                            [user_lastname] => Kraska
                                                            [nickname] => James Kraska
                                                            [user_nicename] => james-kraska
                                                            [display_name] => James Kraska
                                                            [user_email] => uuuu@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:18:31
                                                            [user_description] => James Kraska is the Charles H. Stockton Professor of International Maritime Law in the Stockton Center for International Law at U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. In 2017 and 2018 he served as a Visiting Professor of Law and John Harvey Gregory Lecturer on World Organization at Harvard Law School, where he taught International Law of the Sea.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [27] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 92
                                                            [user_firstname] => Stephen D.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Krasner
                                                            [nickname] => Stephen Krasner
                                                            [user_nicename] => stephen-krasner
                                                            [display_name] => Stephen D. Krasner
                                                            [user_email] => ss2@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-23 00:05:31
                                                            [user_description] => Stephen Krasner is the Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations, the Senior Associate Dean for the Social Sciences, School of Humanities & Sciences, and the deputy director of FSI. A former director of CDDRL, Krasner is also an FSI senior fellow, and a fellow of the Hoover Institution.

From February 2005 to April 2007 he served as the Director of Policy Planning at the US State Department. While at the State Department, Krasner was a driving force behind foreign assistance reform designed to more effectively target American foreign aid. He was also involved in activities related to the promotion of good governance and democratic institutions around the world.

At CDDRL, Krasner was the coordinator of the Program on Sovereignty. His work has dealt primarily with sovereignty, American foreign policy, and the political determinants of international economic relations. Before coming to Stanford in 1981 he taught at Harvard University and UCLA. At Stanford, he was chair of the political science department from 1984 to 1991, and he served as the editor of International Organization from 1986 to 1992.

He has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences (1987-88) and at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (2000-2001). In 2002 he served as director for governance and development at the National Security Council. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

His major publications include Defending the National Interest: Raw Materials Investment and American Foreign Policy (1978), Structural Conflict: The Third World Against Global Liberalism (1985), and Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy (1999). Publications he has edited include International Regimes (1983), Exploration and Contestation in the Study of World Politics (co-editor, 1999),  Problematic Sovereignty: Contested Rules and Political Possibilities (2001), and Power, the State, and Sovereignty: Essays on International Relations (2009). He received a BA in history from Cornell University, an MA in international affairs from Columbia University and a PhD in political science from Harvard.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [28] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 66
                                                            [user_firstname] => Sarah
                                                            [user_lastname] => Kreps
                                                            [nickname] => Sarah Kreps
                                                            [user_nicename] => sarah-kreps
                                                            [display_name] => Sarah Kreps
                                                            [user_email] => vvvv@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:19:39
                                                            [user_description] => Sarah Kreps is an Associate Professor of Government and Adjunct Professor of Law at Cornell University. In 2017-2018, she is an Adjunct Scholar at the Modern War Institute (West Point). She is also a Faculty Fellow in the Milstein Program in Technology and Humanity at the Cornell Tech Campus in New York City.

Dr. Kreps is the author of four books, including, most recently, Taxing Wars: The American Way of War Finance and the Decline of Democracy (Oxford University Press, 2018), which deals with the causes and consequences of how advanced industrialized democracies such as the US, UK, and France pay for its wars.  She has also written two books on drones, including Drones: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2016) and Drone Warfare (Polity Press, 2014; with John Kaag).  Her first book was called Coalitions of Convenience: United States Military Interventions after the Cold War (Oxford University Press, 2011) and analyzed military interventions carried out over the last decade.

Beyond these books, her work has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, World Politics, Journal of Politics, International Security, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Security Studies, Journal of Strategic Studies, Political Science Quarterly, International Studies Perspectives, Foreign Policy Analysis, Polity, African Security Review, the Duke Journal of Comparative and International Law, the International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, Intelligence and National Security, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, and Polity. Her opinions have been featured in a series of media outlets including The Washington Post, International Herald Tribune, New York Times, Christian Science Monitor, USA Today, CNBC, and Reuters.

Dr. Kreps has held fellowships at the Council on Foreign Relations (and is a life member), Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and the University of Virginia’s Miller Center for Public Affairs. She has a BA from Harvard, MSc from Oxford, and PhD from Georgetown. Between 1999-2003, she served on active duty in the United States Air Force.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [29] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 67
                                                            [user_firstname] => Melvyn P.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Leffler
                                                            [nickname] => Melvyn P Leffler
                                                            [user_nicename] => melvyn-p-leffler
                                                            [display_name] => Melvyn P. Leffler
                                                            [user_email] => wwww@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:20:30
                                                            [user_description] => Melvyn P. Leffler is Edward Stettinius Professor of American History at The University of Virginia and Compton Visiting Professor at UVA’s Miller Center. He is the author of several books on the Cold War and on U.S. relations with Europe, including For the Soul of Mankind (2007), which won the George Louis Beer Prize from the American Historical Association, and A Preponderance of Power (1993), which won the Bancroft, Hoover, and Ferrell Prizes. In 2010, he and Odd Arne Westad co-edited the three volume Cambridge History of the Cold War. Along with Jeff Legro and Will Hitchcock, Leffler is co-editor of Shaper Nations: Strategies for a Changing World (Harvard University Press, 2016). Most recently, he published Safeguarding Democratic Nationalism: U.S. Foreign Policy and National Security, 1920-2015 (Princeton, 2017). He has served as president of the Society for the History of American Foreign Relations, Harmsworth Professor at Oxford University, and Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences at The University of Virginia. He is now writing about the foreign policies of the George W. Bush administration.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [30] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 68
                                                            [user_firstname] => Fredrik
                                                            [user_lastname] => Logevall
                                                            [nickname] => Fredrik Logevall
                                                            [user_nicename] => fredrik-logevall
                                                            [display_name] => Fredrik Logevall
                                                            [user_email] => yyyy@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:21:56
                                                            [user_description] => Fredrik Logevall is the Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School and Professor of History. A specialist on U.S. foreign relations history and modern international history, he was previously the Anbinder Professor of History at Cornell University, where he also served as vice provost and as the director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies. Before that he taught at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he co-founded the Center for Cold War Studies. 

Logevall is the author or editor of nine books, most recently Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam (Random House, 2012), which won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History and the 2013 Francis Parkman Prize, as well as the 2013 American Library in Paris Book Award and the 2013 Arthur Ross Book Award from the Council on Foreign Relations. His other recent works include America’s Cold War: The Politics of Insecurity (with Campbell Craig; Belknap/Harvard, 2009), and the college-level textbook A People and A Nation: A History of the United States (with Mary Beth Norton et al; 10th ed., Cengage, 2014). A native of Stockholm, Sweden, Logevall holds a PhD in History from Yale University. He is immediate past president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [31] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 69
                                                            [user_firstname] => Margaret
                                                            [user_lastname] => MacMillan
                                                            [nickname] => Margaret MacMillan
                                                            [user_nicename] => margaret-macmillan
                                                            [display_name] => Margaret MacMillan
                                                            [user_email] => zzzz@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:23:08
                                                            [user_description] => Margaret MacMillan is a Professor of History at the University of Toronto and the former Warden of St. Antony's College. Her books include Women of the Raj (1988, 2007); Paris 1919: Six Months that Changed the World (2001) for which she was the first woman to win the Samuel Johnson Prize; Nixon in China: Six Days that Changed the World; The Uses and Abuses of History (2008); and Extraordinary Canadians: Stephen Leacock (2009). Her most recent book is The War that Ended Peace. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and a Senior Fellow of Massey College, University of Toronto, Honorary Fellow of Trinity College, University of Toronto, Honorary Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University, and of St Hilda’s College and University of Oxford. Margaret is also a Trustee of the Central European University in Budapest, sits on the editorial board of International History and First World War Studies and is a Companion of Honour (UK). She is also a Trustee of the Rhodes Trust.

She has honorary degrees from the University of King’s College, the Royal Military College, The University of Western Ontario, Ryerson University, Toronto, Huron University College of the University of Western Ontario, the University of Calgary, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Bishop’s University and the University of Toronto. In 2006 Professor MacMillan was invested as an Officer of the Order of Canada and in 2015 became a Companion.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [32] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 43
                                                            [user_firstname] => Thomas G.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Mahnken
                                                            [nickname] => Thomas G Mahnken
                                                            [user_nicename] => thomas-g-mahnken
                                                            [display_name] => Thomas G. Mahnken
                                                            [user_email] => www@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:29:17
                                                            [user_description] => Dr. Thomas G. Mahnken is President and Chief Executive Officer of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments.

He is a Senior Research Professor at the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies at The Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and has served for over 20 years as an officer in the U.S. Navy Reserve, to include tours in Iraq and Kosovo.

He currently serves as a member of the Congressionally-mandated National Defense Strategy Commission and as a member of the Board of Visitors of Marine Corps University. His previous government career includes service as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Policy Planning from 2006–2009, where he helped craft the 2006 Quadrennial Defense Review and 2008 National Defense Strategy. He served on the staff of the 2014 National Defense Panel, 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review Independent Panel, and the Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction. He served in the Defense Department’s Office of Net Assessment and as a member of the Gulf War Air Power Survey. In 2009 he was awarded the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service and in 2016 the Department of the Navy Superior Civilian Service Medal.

Dr. Mahnken is the author of Strategy in Asia: The Past, Present and Future of Regional Security (Stanford University Press, 2014), Competitive Strategies for the 21st Century: Theory, History, and Practice (Stanford University Press, 2012), Technology and the American Way of War Since 1945 (Columbia University Press, 2008), and Uncovering Ways of War: U.S. Intelligence and Foreign Military Innovation, 1918–1941 (Cornell University Press, 2002), among other works.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [33] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 94
                                                            [user_firstname] => Rose
                                                            [user_lastname] => McDermott
                                                            [nickname] => Rose McDermott
                                                            [user_nicename] => rose-mcdermott
                                                            [display_name] => Rose McDermott
                                                            [user_email] => a@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-23 16:49:53
                                                            [user_description] => Rose McDermott is the David and Mariana Fisher University Professor of International Relations at Brown University and a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  She received her Ph.D.(Political Science) and M.A. (Experimental Social Psychology) from Stanford University and has taught at Cornell, UCSB  and Harvard. She has held fellowships at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies and the Women and Public Policy Program, all at Harvard University. She has been a fellow at the Stanford Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences twice. She is the author of four books, a co-editor of two additional volumes, and author of over two hundred academic articles across a wide variety of disciplines encompassing topics such as experimentation, emotion and decision making, and the biological and genetic bases of political behavior.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [34] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 70
                                                            [user_firstname] => Paul D.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Miller
                                                            [nickname] => Paul D Miller
                                                            [user_nicename] => paul-d-miller
                                                            [display_name] => Paul D. Miller
                                                            [user_email] => aa@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:23:58
                                                            [user_description] => Dr. Paul D. Miller is a Professor of the Practice of International Affairs at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. He serves as co-chair of the Global Politics and Security concentration in the MSFS program. He is also a non-resident Senior Fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security.

As a practitioner, Dr. Miller served as Director for Afghanistan and Pakistan on the National Security Council staff; worked as an intelligence analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency; and served as a military intelligence officer in the U.S. Army.

His most recent book, American Power and Liberal Order: A Conservative Internationalist Grand Strategy, was published by Georgetown University Press in 2016. In his first book, Armed State Building (Cornell University Press, 2013), Miller examined the history and strategy of stability operations. Miller taught at The University of Texas at Austin and the National Defense University and worked at the RAND Corporation prior to his arrival at Georgetown.

Miller blogs on foreign affairs at Elephants in the Room. His writing has also appeared in Foreign Affairs, Survival, Presidential Studies Quarterly, The Journal of Strategic Studies, Orbis, The American Interest, The National Interest, The World Affairs Journal, Small Wars and Insurgencies, and elsewhere. Miller holds a PhD in international relations and a BA in government from Georgetown University, and a master in public policy from Harvard University.

He is a contributing editor of the Texas National Security Review, a contributing editor of Providence: A Journal of Christianity and American Foreign Policy, a co-editor of the Naval Institute Press’s Series on the Future of Global Security, a research fellow at the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, a member of the advisory board for the Philos Project, and a member of the Texas Lyceum.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [35] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 71
                                                            [user_firstname] => Vipin
                                                            [user_lastname] => Narang
                                                            [nickname] => Vipin Narang
                                                            [user_nicename] => vipin-narang
                                                            [display_name] => Vipin Narang
                                                            [user_email] => bb@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:25:25
                                                            [user_description] => Vipin Narang is an Associate Professor of Political Science at MIT and a member of MIT’s Security Studies Program. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Government, Harvard University in May 2010, where he was awarded the Edward M. Chase Prize for the best dissertation in international relations. He holds a B.S. and M.S. in chemical engineering with distinction from Stanford University and an M. Phil with Distinction in international relations from Balliol College, Oxford University, where he studied on a Marshall Scholarship. He has been a fellow at Harvard University’s Olin Institute for Strategic Studies, a predoctoral fellow at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and a Stanton junior faculty fellow at Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Cooperation. His research interests include nuclear proliferation and strategy, South Asian security, and general security studies.

His first book Nuclear Strategy in the Modern Era (Princeton University Press, 2014) on the deterrence strategies of regional nuclear powers won the 2015 ISA International Security Studies Section Best Book Award. He is currently working on his second book, Strategies of Nuclear Proliferation (Princeton University Press, under contract), which explores how states pursue nuclear weapons.  His work has been published in several journals including International Security, Journal of Conflict Resolution, The Washington Quarterly,and International Organization.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [36] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 72
                                                            [user_firstname] => Janne E.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Nolan
                                                            [nickname] => Janne E Nolan
                                                            [user_nicename] => janne-e-nolan
                                                            [display_name] => Janne E Nolan
                                                            [user_email] => cc@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:26:35
                                                            [user_description] => Janne E. Nolan chairs the Nuclear Security Working Group and is a faculty member at the Elliott School of International Affairs of the George Washington University. She has had extensive experience in national security in government and the private sector, holding senior staff positions in the Department of State and the U.S. Senate and as a member of several blue ribbon commissions including the White House Presidential Advisory Board on U.S. Arms and Technology Policy (chairman), the National Defense Panel, the Department of State’s Accountability Review Board, the Congressionally-appointed Panel to Assess the Ballistic Missile Threat to the U.S., and the Secretary of Defense’s Policy Board.

Her private sector appointments include Professor of International Affairs and Deputy Director of the Ridgway Center at the University of Pittsburgh; Director and Research Professor at Georgetown University;  Director of Foreign Policy for The Century Foundation of New York, and Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution.  

Her eight books include Guardians of the Arsenal: The Politics of Nuclear Strategy; Trappings of Power: Ballistic Missiles in the Third World; An Elusive Consensus: Nuclear Weapons and American Security after the Cold War; and Tyranny of Consensus: Discourse and Dissent in American National Security as well as numerous articles in publications such as Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, The New Republic and the National Interest. 

She serves as an advisor or board member at the American Middle East Institute, the Arms Control Association, the Monterey Institute’s Non-Proliferation Review, the Hewlett Foundation Nuclear Advisory Committee, and the Center for Climate and Security. She is a member of the Cosmos Club and the Council on Foreign Relations.

The NSWG is chaired by Dr. Janne Nolan of the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University.

With membership drawn from a wide variety of professional backgrounds, the NSWG provides a forum for experts in different fields to share their perspectives and learn from one another. Through frequent dinner meetings and conferences, the NSWG enables the nation’s leading experts in international security and nuclear issues to share information and collaborate. The group conducts its activities in a not-for-attribution setting, enabling members and participants to freely express their thoughts and ideas.

By establishing a knowledge base of non-partisan foreign policy professionals, the NSWG serves as a resource for administration officials and members of Congress to utilize when real-time expertise is needed. Members of the group regularly meet with senior administration officials and members of both parties on Capitol Hill to help bridge the partisan divide and contribute to the formation and implementation of a nuclear security policy that serves the national interest of the United States.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [37] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 85
                                                            [user_firstname] => John
                                                            [user_lastname] => Owen
                                                            [nickname] => John Owen
                                                            [user_nicename] => john-owen
                                                            [display_name] => John Owen
                                                            [user_email] => qq@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:48:06
                                                            [user_description] => John Owen, A.B. (Duke), M.P.A. (Princeton), A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), Taylor Professor of Politics, is a political scientist who specializes in the study of international relations. He teaches in the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics at the University of Virginia, and is a Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture (IASC). He also is Editor-in-Chief of Security Studies, currently housed at the Miller Center of Public Affairs.

Owen's research concerns how ideological and cultural similarities and differences affect, and are affected by, international relations. He is interested in particular in the relationship between international hegemony or authority and ideological attractiveness; how transnational ideological networks carry and perpetuate both hegemonic and counter-hegemonic ideologies (e.g., Islamism; authoritarian capitalism) and how these can cause civil unrest, foreign intervention, and war; how political identities de-activate and re-activate; and the life cycles of regime types across regions (e.g., how did liberal democracy come to be dominant in so many places? how long will this dominance last? how might it end?).

His newest book is Confronting Political Islam: Six Lessons from the West's History (Princeton University Press, 2014). From transnational ideological struggles in the history of the West, the book draws lessons on the dynamics of conflict in the Muslim world today and what the outside world ought, and ought not, to do in response.

Confronting Political Islam builds upon Owen's preceding two books. The Clash of Ideas in World Politics: Transnational Networks, States, and Regime Change 1510-2010 (Princeton University Press, 2010) advances an explanation for forcible foreign regime promotion, a practice that has waxed and waned across the past five centuries. The book won the 2011 Joseph Lepgold Prize for Best Book on International Relations, awarded by the Mortara Center at Georgetown University. A Chinese language version is forthcoming from World Affairs Press in Beijing. An interview on WMRA public radio about Clash of Ideas is available here. Religion, the Enlightenment, and the New Global Order (Columbia University Press, 2011), co-edited with J. Judd Owen of Emory University and produced under the auspices of the IASC, considers whether the solutions to religious conflict proposed by the Western Enlightenment are feasible within, or appropriate to, non-Western religions.

Owen's first book, Liberal Peace, Liberal War: American Politics and International Security (Cornell University Press, 1997), and several of his articles and book chapters, advance an explanation for why liberal democracies seldom fight wars against one another. Owen also has published work on the Western canon and IR theory; the sources and prospects of American hegemony; the rationalist-constructivist divide in IR research; forcible domestic regime (e.g., democracy) promotion; and the ongoing Iraq war. His work has appeared in the European Journal of International Relations, International Organization, International Security, International Studies Quarterly, International Politics, Internationale Politik und Gesellschaft, International Relations, Perspectives on Politics, as well as the New York Times, Foreign Affairs, National Interest, and a number of edited volumes, most recently International Relations Theory and Regional Transformation, ed. T.V. Paul (Cambridge University Press, 2012).
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [38] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 118
                                                            [user_firstname] => Patrick
                                                            [user_lastname] => Porter
                                                            [nickname] => Patrick Porter
                                                            [user_nicename] => patrick-porter
                                                            [display_name] => Patrick Porter
                                                            [user_email] => a2@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2018-01-17 14:48:30
                                                            [user_description] => Professor Patrick Porter is the Chair of Strategic Studies at the University of Exeter, Academic Director of Strategy and Security Institute and Senior Associate Fellow at RUSI. Patrick’s two university press books earned critical acclaim, Military Orientalism: Eastern War through Western Eyes (2009) was listed on the UK Chief of Defence Staff's Reading List. His latest book, The Global Village Myth: Distance, War and the Limits of Power, is a major critique of assumptions about globalisation and insecurity.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [39] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 89
                                                            [user_firstname] => Thomas
                                                            [user_lastname] => Rid
                                                            [nickname] => Thomas Rid
                                                            [user_nicename] => thomas-rid
                                                            [display_name] => Thomas Rid
                                                            [user_email] => uu@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:52:51
                                                            [user_description] => Thomas Rid is Professor of Strategic Studies at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies.

Rid’s most recent book, Rise of the Machines (2016), tells the sweeping story of how cybernetics, a late-1940s theory of machines, came to incite anarchy and war (translated into Chinese, Russian, German, Japanese, and Turkish). His 2015 article “Attributing Cyber Attacks” was designed to explain, guide, and improve the identification of network breaches (Journal of Strategic Studies 2015). In 2013 he published the widely-read book Cyber War Will Not Take Place. Rid testified on information security in front of the US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence as well as in the German Bundestag and the UK Parliament.

From 2011 to 2016, Rid was a professor in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London. Between 2003 and 2010, he worked at major think tanks in Berlin, Paris, Jerusalem, and Washington, DC. Rid holds a PhD from Humboldt University in Berlin.

Thomas lives in Washington, DC.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [40] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 73
                                                            [user_firstname] => Joshua
                                                            [user_lastname] => Rovner
                                                            [nickname] => Joshua Rovner
                                                            [user_nicename] => joshua-rovner
                                                            [display_name] => Joshua Rovner
                                                            [user_email] => dd@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:28:24
                                                            [user_description] => Joshua Rovner, associate professor at the School of International Service, is a political scientist specializing in intelligence, strategy, and U.S. foreign policy. Rovner is the co-editor of Chaos in the Liberal Order: The Trump Presidency and International Politics in the 21st Century (Columbia University Press, forthcoming in 2018), which asks whether the rise of Donald Trump signals the end of the U.S.-led international order. Chaos in the Liberal Order brings together leading historians, political scientists, and policymakers to shed light on an extraordinary moment in world affairs. His first book was Fixing the Facts: National Security and the Politics of Intelligence (Cornell University Press, 2011), a pathbreaking study on the politicization of intelligence estimates. Fixing the Facts includes detailed histories of the Vietnam War, Cold War estimates of the Soviet Union, and the controversies surrounding the Iraq War. The book won the International Studies Association’s best book award for security studies, and the Edgar S. Furniss Book Award, presented by the Mershon Center at Ohio State University. In addition to writing many book chapters and policy pieces, Rovner has written commentary in The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, The Dallas Morning News, The National Interest, and Lawfare. He recently began a monthly column on intelligence and strategy for War on the Rocks. He has written journal articles in Security Studies, The Journal of Strategic Studies, Diplomacy & Statecraft, Intelligence and National Security, The International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, The Washington Quarterly, and Orbis. Beginning in 2018 he will become managing editor of H-Diplo’s International Security Studies Forum, and as deputy editor of The Journal of Strategic Studies. Prof. Rovner previously held the John Goodwin Tower Distinguished Chair in international Politics and National Security at Southern Methodist University, and as Associate Professor of Strategy & Policy at the U.S. Naval War College.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [41] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 108
                                                            [user_firstname] => Brent E.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Sasley
                                                            [nickname] => Brent Sasley
                                                            [user_nicename] => brent-sasley
                                                            [display_name] => Brent E. Sasley
                                                            [user_email] => a1@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-12-14 20:19:02
                                                            [user_description] => Brent Sasley is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Texas at Arlington, where he teaches Israeli and Middle East politics.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [42] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 74
                                                            [user_firstname] => Elizabeth N.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Saunders
                                                            [nickname] => Elizabeth N Saunders
                                                            [user_nicename] => elizabeth-n-saunders
                                                            [display_name] => Elizabeth N. Saunders
                                                            [user_email] => ee@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:29:18
                                                            [user_description] => Elizabeth N. Saunders is an Associate Professor in the School of Foreign Service and a core faculty member in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown. She is also a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a senior editor at the Washington Post’s political science blog, The Monkey Cage. Her research and teaching interests focus on international security and U.S. foreign policy, including the presidency and foreign policy, and the politics of using force. Her book, Leaders at War: How Presidents Shape Military Interventions, was published in 2011 by Cornell University Press and won the 2012 Jervis-Schroeder Best Book Award from APSA’s International History and Politics section. She has previously been a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; a postdoctoral fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University; a Brookings Institution Research Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies; and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. She holds an A.B. in physics and astronomy and astrophysics from Harvard College; an M.Phil. in international relations from the University of Cambridge; and a Ph.D. in political science from Yale University.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [43] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 75
                                                            [user_firstname] => Kori
                                                            [user_lastname] => Schake
                                                            [nickname] => Kori Schake
                                                            [user_nicename] => kori-schake
                                                            [display_name] => Kori Schake
                                                            [user_email] => ff@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:30:36
                                                            [user_description] => Kori Schake is deputy director-general of the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

Previously, Schake was a distinguished research fellow at the Hoover Institution. She has also served as deputy head of policy planning at the U.S. State Department and director for defense strategy and requirements on the National Security Council, along with positions in the U.S. Department of Defense.

Schake has also held the distinguished chair of international security studies at West Point and has served on the faculties of Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, the University of Maryland's School of Public Policy, and the National Defense University.

She is author of Safe Passage and, along with Secretary Jim Mattis, the editor of Warriors and Citizens: American Views of Our Military.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [44] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 76
                                                            [user_firstname] => Michael N.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Schmitt
                                                            [nickname] => Michael N Schmitt
                                                            [user_nicename] => michael-n-schmitt
                                                            [display_name] => Michael N. Schmitt
                                                            [user_email] => gg@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:34:40
                                                            [user_description] => Michael Schmitt is the Howard S. Levie Professor of Law and Armed Conflict at the U.S. Naval War College's Stockton Center for International Law. He is also the Francis Lieber Distinguished Scholar at the United States Military Academy’s Lieber Institute, Professor of Public International Law at the University of Exeter, and Senior Fellow at the NATO Cooperative Cyber Defense Centre of Excellence.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [45] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 77
                                                            [user_firstname] => Jacob N.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Shapiro
                                                            [nickname] => Jacob N Shapiro
                                                            [user_nicename] => jacob-n-shapiro
                                                            [display_name] => Jacob N. Shapiro
                                                            [user_email] => hh@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:36:18
                                                            [user_description] => Jacob N. Shapiro is Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project, a multi-university consortium that compiles and analyzes micro-level conflict data and other information on politically motivated violence in countries around the world. He studies conflict, economic and political development, and security policy. He is author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. His research has been published in broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan.

Shapiro received the 2016 Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40 or within 10 years of earning a Ph.D. who has made the most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), a Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Research in Pakistan (CERP), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Ph.D. Political Science, M.A. Economics, Stanford University. B.A. Political Science, University of Michigan. Prior to graduate school Shapiro served in the United States Navy.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [46] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 78
                                                            [user_firstname] => Sandesh
                                                            [user_lastname] => Sivakumaran
                                                            [nickname] => Sandesh Sivakumaran
                                                            [user_nicename] => sandesh-sivakumaran
                                                            [display_name] => Sandesh Sivakumaran
                                                            [user_email] => ii@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:38:45
                                                            [user_description] => Sandesh Sivakumaran is Professor of Public International Law. He is a member of the advisory board of Geneva Call and a member of the working group on non-state armed groups at the Centre of Competence on Humanitarian Negotiation. He has been a non-resident research scholar at the United States Naval War College Stockton Center for International Law and has held visiting fellowships at Melbourne Law School and New York University School of Law.

Sandesh has published on a variety of topics in public international law. He is the author of The Law of Non-International Armed Conflict (Oxford University Press, 2012), which was awarded the International Committee of the Red Cross Paul Reuter Prize, the American Society of International Law Francis Lieber Prize, and (jointly) the European Society of International Law Book Prize. He is the co-author of Oppenheim's International Law: United Nations (Oxford University Press, 2017)(with Dame Rosalyn Higgins, Philippa Webb, Dapo Akande and James Sloan), co-author of Cases and Materials on International Law (Sweet and Maxwell, 8 ed, 2015)(with David Harris), and co-editor of International Human Rights Law (Oxford University Press, 3 ed, 2017)(with Daniel Moeckli and Sangeeta Shah). He has published in leading journals including the European Journal of International Law, the International and Comparative Law Quarterly and the Human Rights Quarterly. His article on the courts of armed groups was awarded the Journal of International Criminal Justice Giorgio La Pira prize and the Antonio Cassese prize. His work has been cited by, among others, the UK, Netherlands, and Israeli Supreme Courts; the International Criminal Court; the International Law Commission; and UN commissions of inquiry.

Sandesh advises and acts as expert for a range of states, international organizations and non-governmental organizations. He has served as international legal advisor to the Appeals Chamber of the Special Court for Sierra Leone, conflict advisor to the Secretariat of the World Humanitarian Summit, and assisted negotiators of two peace processes on matters of international law. He is a member of the Reading Committee of the ICRC's Commentaries on the Geneva Conventions and Additional Protocols and was a member of the Core Group of Experts for the Oxford Guidance on the Law Relating to Humanitarian Relief Operations in Situations of Armed Conflict. Sandesh regularly trains diplomats, members of the armed forces, and UN entities on international law and the law of war. He is a member of the Bar of the State of New York.

Prior to entering academia, Sandesh's professional experience included: Fellow, previously Research Fellow, at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge; Fellow of the International Bar Association and Associate Legal Officer to Judge Mohamed Shahabuddeen at the Appeals Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda; Law Clerk to Judges Dame Rosalyn Higgins and Peter Tomka at the International Court of Justice; and Intern for former President of Ireland and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Mary Robinson, at Realizing Rights: the Ethical Globalization Initiative.

Sandesh holds an MA and PhD from the University of Cambridge and an LLM from New York University School of Law where he was a Hauser Global Scholar.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [47] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 79
                                                            [user_firstname] => Sarah B.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Snyder
                                                            [nickname] => Sarah Snyder
                                                            [user_nicename] => sarah-snyder
                                                            [display_name] => Sarah Snyder
                                                            [user_email] => jj@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:40:36
                                                            [user_description] => Sarah B. Snyder is a historian of U.S. foreign relations who specializes in the history of the Cold War, human rights activism, and U.S. human rights policy.  She is the author of From Selma to Moscow: How Human Rights Activists Transformed U.S. Foreign Policy (Columbia University Press, 2018), which explains how transnational connections and 1960s-era social movements inspired Americans to advocate for a new approach to human rights.

Her first book, Human Rights Activism and the End of the Cold War: A Transnational History of the Helsinki Network (Cambridge University Press), analyzes the development of a transnational network devoted to human rights advocacy and its contributions to the end of the Cold War. The Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations awarded it the 2012 Stuart Bernath Book Prize by for best first book by an author and the 2012 Myrna F. Bernath Book Award for the best book written by a woman in the field in the previous two years.

In addition to authoring several chapters in edited collections, she has also published articles in Diplomatic History, Cold War History, Human Rights Quarterly, Diplomacy & Statecraft, Journal of Transatlantic Studies, European Journal of Human Rights, and Journal of American Studies.

She previously served as a Lecturer at University College London, a Cassius Marcellus Clay Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at Yale University, the Pierre Keller Post -Doctoral Fellow in Transatlantic Relations at the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies also at Yale, and as a professorial lecturer at Georgetown University.

She received her Ph.D. from Georgetown, a M.A. from University College London, and a B.A. with honors from Brown University.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [48] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 80
                                                            [user_firstname] => Bartholomew
                                                            [user_lastname] => Sparrow
                                                            [nickname] => Bartholomew Sparrow
                                                            [user_nicename] => bartholomew-sparrow
                                                            [display_name] => Bartholomew Sparrow
                                                            [user_email] => ll@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:41:39
                                                            [user_description] => Professor Sparrow studies American political development and, in particular, the conjunction between the American state and the international system. He teaches courses on American territorial expansion, American political institutions and processes (graduate), American politics and government (introductory), political communication, and the politics of food in America. He has received fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University, and Harry S. Truman Library Institute. He has been awarded the Leonard D. White and the Franklin L. Burdette/Pi Sigma Alpha prizes from the American Political Science Association. He has been recognized as one of the Texas Ten, 2018, an "annual list of inspiring professors, nominated by alumni and selected by the Alcalde magazine," and received the Department of Government's "2017 Graduate Student Outstanding Faculty Award for Distinguished Service to Graduate Students." 

Sparrow is the author of The Strategist: Brent Scowcroft and the Call of National Security, a biography of the former U.S. national security advisor.  He is previously the author of The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire; Uncertain Guardians: The News Media as a Political Institution; and From the Outside In: World War II and the American State.  He is co-editor, with Sanford Levinson, of The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion, 1803-1898 and, with Roderick Hart, of Politics, Discourse, and American Society: New Agendas.  He has chapters in several edited volumes, and his articles have appeared in the American Political Science Review, Political Communication, Diplomatic History, the International Journal of Public Opinion Research, and other journals.  He attended Dartmouth College, The University of Texas at Austin, and the University of Chicago.

He is currently writing about the political and constitutional legacies of the fact that over half of European Americans who arrived in the British North American colonies were unfree workers, bound to their masters for typically four to seven years. For the project he has received support from the American Antiquarian Society, Newberry Library, and College of Liberal Arts at The University of Texas at Austin.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [49] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 81
                                                            [user_firstname] => Monica
                                                            [user_lastname] => Duffy Toft
                                                            [nickname] => Monica Toft
                                                            [user_nicename] => monica-toft
                                                            [display_name] => Monica Duffy Toft
                                                            [user_email] => mm@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:42:46
                                                            [user_description] => Monica Duffy Toft is a Professor of International Politics and Director of the Center for Strategic Studies at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. Before joining Fletcher, Professor Monica Duffy Toft taught at Oxford University’s Blavatnik School of Government and Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. While at Harvard, she directed the Initiative on Religion in International Affairs and was the assistant director of the John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies. She was educated at the University of Chicago (MA and Ph.D. in political science) and at the University of California, Santa Barbara (BA in political science and Slavic languages and literature, summa cum laude). Prior to this, she spent four years in the United States Army as a Russian linguist. Monica’s areas of research include international security, ethnic and religious violence, civil wars and demography. Her most recent books include: "Securing the Peace," (Princeton, 2011); "Political Demography," (Oxford, 2012); and "God’s Century," (Norton, 2012). In addition she has published numerous scholarly articles and editorials on civil wars, territory and nationalism, demography, and religion in global politics. Monica can also be found on Twitter @monicaduffytoft. Affiliations: Monica is a research associate of the Blavatnik School of Government at the University of Oxford and at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. She is a supernumerary fellow at Brasenose College, University of Oxford, a Global Scholar of the Peace Research Institute Oslo, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Minorities at Risk Advisory Board and the Political Instability Task Force. In 2008 the Carnegie Foundation of New York named her a Carnegie Scholar for her research on religion and violence, in 2012 she was named a Fulbright scholar, and most recently served as the World Politics Fellow at Princeton University.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [50] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 97
                                                            [user_firstname] => Marc
                                                            [user_lastname] => Trachtenberg
                                                            [nickname] => Marc Trachtenberg
                                                            [user_nicename] => marc-trachtenberg
                                                            [display_name] => Marc Trachtenberg
                                                            [user_email] => e@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-23 23:04:56
                                                            [user_description] => Marc Trachtenberg studies national security strategy, diplomatic history, and international relations. He has been Fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the German Marshall Fund, and the SSRC/MacArthur Foundation. His award winning book, A Constructed Peace: The Making of the European Settlement, 1945-1963 (Princeton University Press, 1999), explores the profound impact of nuclear weapons on the conduct of international relations during the Cold War, making extensive use of newly opened documentary archives in Europe and the United States. History and Strategy (Princeton University Press, 1991) studies seminal events like the onset of World War I and the Cuban Missile Crisis to shed light on the role of force in international affairs. Professor Trachtenberg teaches courses on the history of international relations, international security, and historical research methods. His web site provides extensive resources for obtaining and interpreting documentary evidence about the Cold War.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [51] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 82
                                                            [user_firstname] => René
                                                            [user_lastname] => Värk
                                                            [nickname] => Rene Vark
                                                            [user_nicename] => rene-vark
                                                            [display_name] => René Värk
                                                            [user_email] => nn@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:45:02
                                                            [user_description] => 
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [52] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 83
                                                            [user_firstname] => Steven
                                                            [user_lastname] => Weber
                                                            [nickname] => Steven Weber
                                                            [user_nicename] => steven-weber
                                                            [display_name] => Steven Weber
                                                            [user_email] => oo@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:46:14
                                                            [user_description] => Steven Weber is a specialist in International Relations and International Political Economy with expertise in international and national security; the impact of technology on national systems of innovation, defense, and deterrence; and the political economy of knowledge-intensive industries particularly software and pharmaceuticals.

Trained in history and international development at Washington University, and medicine and political science at Stanford, Weber joined the Berkeley faculty in 1989. In 1992 he served as special consultant to the president of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in London. He has held academic fellowships with the Council on Foreign Relations and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and was Director of the Institute of International Studies from 2004 to 2009. He is Senior Policy Advisor with the Glover Park Group in Washington DC and actively advises government agencies, private multinational firms, and international non-governmental organizations on issues of foreign policy, risk analysis, strategy, and forecasting.

Weber’s major publications include The Success of Open Source, Cooperation and Discord in U.S.-Soviet Arms Control, and the edited book Globalization and the European Political Economy; and numerous articles and chapters in the areas of U.S. foreign policy, the political economy of trade and technology, politics of the post-Cold War world, and European integration. With colleagues  Bruce W. Jentleson at Duke and James Goldgeier, Dean of SIS at American University, Weber directs the New Era Foreign Policy Project funded principally by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.  Weber and Jentleson published in 2010 The End of Arrogance: America in the Global Competition of Ideas. His most recent book, edited with Nils Gilman of UC Berkeley and Jesse Goldhammer of Monitor Deloitte, is Deviant Globalization: Black Market Economy in the 21st Century.  He is currently writing Beyond the Globally Integrated Enterprise, a book that explains how economic geography is evolving and the consequences for multinational organizations in the post financial crisis world, and is directing a collaborative research effort on the employment effects of modern Information Technology.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [53] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 84
                                                            [user_firstname] => Amy
                                                            [user_lastname] => Zegart
                                                            [nickname] => Amy Zegart
                                                            [user_nicename] => amy-zegart
                                                            [display_name] => Amy Zegart
                                                            [user_email] => pp@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:46:59
                                                            [user_description] => Amy Zegart is a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute of International Studies (FSI), professor of political science (by courtesy) at Stanford University, and a contributing editor to The Atlantic. She is also the Davies Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, where she directs the Robert and Marion Oster National Security Affairs Fellows program. From 2013 to 2018, she served as co-director of the Freeman Spogli Institute’s Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) and founder and co-director of the Stanford Cyber Policy Program. She previously served as the chief academic officer of the Hoover Institution.

Her areas of expertise include cybersecurity, US intelligence and foreign policy, drone warfare, and political risk. An award-winning author, she has written four books. These include Political Risk: How Businesses and Organizations Can Anticipate Global Insecurity (2018) with Condoleezza Rice; Spying Blind: The CIA, the FBI, and Origins of 9/11 (2007), which won the National Academy of Public Administration’s Brownlow Book Award; Flawed by Design: The Evolution of the CIA, JCS, and NSC (1999); and Eyes on Spies: Congress and the US Intelligence Community (Hoover Institution Press, 2011). She has also published in leading academic journals, including International Security, the Journal of Strategic Studies, and Political Science Quarterly.

Zegart has been featured by the National Journal as one of the ten most influential experts in intelligence reform. She served on the Clinton administration’s National Security Council staff and as a foreign policy adviser to the Bush‑Cheney 2000 presidential campaign. She has also testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee; provided training to the US Marine Corps; and advised officials on intelligence, homeland security, and cybersecurity matters. Her commentary has been featured on national television networks, NPR, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and elsewhere. Before her academic career, Zegart spent three years as a McKinsey & Company management consultant advising leading companies on strategy and organizational effectiveness. She came to Stanford from UCLA, where she was a professor of public policy in the Luskin School of Public Affairs.  

She has won two UCLA teaching awards, the American Political Science Association’s Leonard D. White Dissertation Award, and grants from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Hewlett Foundation, the Smith Richardson Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.

Zegart’s public service includes serving on the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation, the FBI Intelligence Analysts Association National Advisory Board, the Los Angeles Police Department’s Counter‑Terrorism and Community Police Advisory Board, the National Academies of Science Panel to Improve Intelligence Analysis, and the Social Science Research Council Task Force on Securing Knowledge. A former Fulbright Scholar, she received an AB. in East Asian studies magna cum laude from Harvard University and an MA and PhD in political science from Stanford University. She serves on the board of directors of Kratos Defense & Security Solutions (KTOS). She is a native of Louisville, Kentucky.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                        )

                                    [exclude] => 
                                    [user_role] => 
                                )

                            [2] => Array
                                (
                                    [acf_fc_layout] => wgt_authors
                                    [title] => Policy and Strategy Advisory Board
                                    [wgt_type] => manual
                                    [users] => Array
                                        (
                                            [0] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 39
                                                            [user_firstname] => William
                                                            [user_lastname] => McRaven
                                                            [nickname] => William McRaven
                                                            [user_nicename] => william-mcraven
                                                            [display_name] => William McRaven
                                                            [user_email] => aa1@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:42:35
                                                            [user_description] => 
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [1] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 40
                                                            [user_firstname] => Elliott
                                                            [user_lastname] => Abrams
                                                            [nickname] => Elliott Abrams
                                                            [user_nicename] => elliott-abrams
                                                            [display_name] => Elliott Abrams
                                                            [user_email] => ttt@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:44:03
                                                            [user_description] => Elliott Abrams is senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) in Washington, DC. He served as deputy assistant to the president and deputy national security advisor in the administration of President George W. Bush, where he supervised U.S. policy in the Middle East for the White House.

Abrams was educated at Harvard College, the London School of Economics, and Harvard Law School. After serving on the staffs of Senators Henry M. Jackson and Daniel P. Moynihan, he was an assistant secretary of state in the Reagan administration and received the secretary of state's Distinguished Service Award from Secretary George P. Shultz. In 2012, the Washington Institute for Near East Policy gave him its Scholar-Statesman Award.

Abrams was president of the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, DC, from 1996 until joining the White House staff. He was a member of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom from 1999 to 2001 and chairman of the commission in the latter year, and served a second term as a member of the Commission in 2012-2014. From 2009 to 2016, Abrams was a member of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, which directs the activities of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. He is a member of the board of the National Endowment for Democracy, and teaches U.S. foreign policy at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.

Abrams joined the Bush administration in June 2001 as special assistant to the president and senior director of the National Security Council for democracy, human rights, and international organizations. From December 2002 to February 2005, he served as special assistant to the president and senior director of the National Security Council for Near East and North African affairs. He served as deputy assistant to the president and deputy national security advisor for global democracy strategy from February 2005 to January 2009, and in that capacity supervised both the Near East and North African affairs and the democracy, human rights, and international organizations directorates of the National Security Council.

Abrams is the author of five books: Undue Process, Security and Sacrifice, Faith or Fear: How Jews Can Survive in a Christian America, Tested by Zion: The Bush Administration and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, and most recently Realism and Democracy: American Foreign Policy After the Arab Spring. He is the editor of three more, Close Calls: Intervention, Terrorism, Missile Defense and "Just War" Today; Honor Among Nations: Intangible Interests and Foreign Policy; and The Influence of Faith: Religious Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [2] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 151
                                                            [user_firstname] => Stephen
                                                            [user_lastname] => Biegun
                                                            [nickname] => Stephen.Biegun
                                                            [user_nicename] => stephen-biegun
                                                            [display_name] => Stephen Biegun
                                                            [user_email] => Stephen.Biegun@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2018-03-06 18:36:22
                                                            [user_description] => Stephen E. Biegun is an American businessman and diplomat serving as the United States Special Representative for North Korea. Biegun previously served as Vice President of International Governmental Affairs for the Ford Motor Company, and in government roles as a staffer on the National Security Council as well as national security adviser to Senator Bill Frist.

Biegun received his B.A. in Russian and Political Science from the University of Michigan in 1984. He was the in-country Director for the International Republican Institute in Moscow, Russia from 1992-1994. He is a member of the board of the U.S. Russia Foundation, the Moscow School of Political Studies, the U.S.–Russia Business Council, and Ford Sollers, Ford's joint venture operating in Russia.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [3] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 31
                                                            [user_firstname] => Brad
                                                            [user_lastname] => Carson
                                                            [nickname] => Brad Carson
                                                            [user_nicename] => brad-carson
                                                            [display_name] => Brad Carson
                                                            [user_email] => lll@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:11:59
                                                            [user_description] => Brad Carson has built a distinguished career in public service, law, and education. Before joining the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy at the University of Virginia, he was the acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel & Readiness at the Department of Defense. Carson oversaw the human resources, military readiness, education and training, and health care of the nearly 5 million servicemembers, civilian employees, and their dependents within the Department of Defense and managed an internal organization of 30,000 employees. For his work, the military historian Richard Kohn hailed Carson as the most consequential person to ever hold the job. Carson earlier served as the Under Secretary of the U.S. Army, where he managed the daily operations of the largest military service, and as General Counsel of the U.S. Army, where he managed the world-wide legal operations of the largest military service. A Rhodes Scholar, he is widely published and a noted authority on national security, energy policy, and American politics. From 2001-2005, he served two terms as a U.S. Congressman. Later, he was appointed to the faculty of the business and law schools at the University of Tulsa, where he directed the National Energy Policy Institute and taught academic courses on energy policy, property law, negotiation and game theory, globalization, and law and literature. Carson deployed as an intelligence officer during Operation Iraqi Freedom and was awarded the Bronze Star for his service.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [4] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 30
                                                            [user_firstname] => Derek
                                                            [user_lastname] => Chollet
                                                            [nickname] => Derek Chollet
                                                            [user_nicename] => derek-chollet
                                                            [display_name] => Derek Chollet
                                                            [user_email] => jjj@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:04:25
                                                            [user_description] => Derek Chollet is executive vice president and senior advisor for security and defense policy at The German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF). He is a contributing editor to Foreign Policy, where he coedits “Shadow Government,” and is a regular contributor to Defense One. He is also an advisor to Beacon Global Strategies, an adjunct senior research scholar at Columbia University’s Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, and a visiting fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perry World House.

From 2012-2015, Chollet was the U.S. assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs, where he managed U.S. defense policy toward Europe (including NATO), the Middle East, Africa, and the Western Hemisphere. In that role, he was a senior advisor to two secretaries of defense, Leon Panetta and Chuck Hagel.

Prior to joining the Pentagon, Chollet served at the White House as special assistant to the president and senior director for strategic planning on the National Security Council Staff. From 2009 to 2011, he was the principal deputy director of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s Policy Planning Staff. From November 2008 to January 2009, he was a member of the Obama-Biden presidential transition team.

During the Clinton Administration, Chollet served as chief speechwriter for UN Ambassador Richard Holbrooke, and as special adviser to Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott. From 2002 to 2004, Chollet was foreign policy adviser to U.S. Senator John Edwards (D-NC), both on his legislative staff and during the 2004 Kerry-Edwards presidential campaign.

Chollet has been a fellow at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), the Brookings Institution, the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), and the American Academy in Berlin. He has been a visiting scholar and adjunct professor at The George Washington University and an adjunct associate professor at Georgetown University.  He also assisted former Secretaries of State James A. Baker III and Warren Christopher, as well as Holbrooke and Talbott, with the research and writing of their memoirs.

Chollet is author, co-author, or co-editor of seven books on U.S. foreign policy, including The Long Game: How Obama Defied Washington and Redefined America’s Role in the World (PublicAffairs, 2016), America Between the Wars: From 11/9 to 9/11, co-authored with James Goldgeier (PublicAffairs, 2008), and The Unquiet American: Richard Holbrooke in the World, co-edited with Samantha Power (PublicAffairs, 2011), and his commentaries and reviews on U.S. foreign policy and politics have appeared in many other books and publications.

He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the U.S. Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service, the U.S. Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service, the U.S. State Department Superior Honor Award, the Latvia Minister of Defense Medal of Honorary Recognition, and the Lithuania Minister of Defense Medal of Merit.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [5] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 33
                                                            [user_firstname] => Ryan
                                                            [user_lastname] => Crocker
                                                            [nickname] => Ryan Crocker
                                                            [user_nicename] => ryan-crocker
                                                            [display_name] => Ryan Crocker
                                                            [user_email] => nnn@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:20:08
                                                            [user_description] => Ryan Crocker is currently an executive professor at Texas A&M University. From 2010–2011 and 2013–2016, he served as dean and executive professor at the George Bush School of Government & Public Service at Texas A&M where he was holder of the Edward and Howard Kruse Endowed Chair.

He retired from the Foreign Service in April 2009 after a career of more than 37 years but was recalled to active duty by President Obama to serve as U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan in 2011. He has served as U.S. Ambassador six times: Afghanistan (2011–2012), Iraq (2007–2009), Pakistan (2004–2007), Syria (1998–2001), Kuwait (1994–1997), and Lebanon (1990–1993).

Born in Spokane, Washington, he grew up in an Air Force family, attending schools in Morocco, Canada, and Turkey, as well as the United States. He received a B.A. in English in 1971 and an honorary doctor of laws degree in 2001 from Whitman College (Washington). He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Academy of Diplomacy, and the Association of American Ambassadors. In August 2013, he was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve on the Broadcasting Board of Governors, which oversees all U.S. government-supported civilian international media. He is also on the board of directors of Mercy Corps International.

Ambassador Crocker received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award, in 2009. In July 2012, he was named an Honorary Marine, the 75th civilian so honored since the founding of the Corps in 1775.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [6] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 35
                                                            [user_firstname] => Eric
                                                            [user_lastname] => Edelman
                                                            [nickname] => Eric Edelman
                                                            [user_nicename] => eric-edelman
                                                            [display_name] => Eric Edelman
                                                            [user_email] => ppp@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:26:44
                                                            [user_description] => Ambassador Eric S. Edelman retired as a career minister from the U.S. Foreign Service on May 1, 2009. He is currently a Roger Hertog Practitioner in Residence at Johns Hopkins SAIS and Counselor at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments.

Edelman has served in senior positions at the Departments of State and Defense as well as the White House where he led organizations providing analysis, strategy, policy development, security services, trade advocacy, public outreach, citizen services and congressional relations. As the undersecretary of defense for policy (August, 2005-January 2009) he oversaw strategy development as DoD’s senior policy official with global responsibility for bilateral defense relations, war plans, special operations forces, homeland defense, missile defense, nuclear weapons and arms control policies, counter-proliferation, counter-narcotics, counter-terrorism, arms sales, and defense trade controls.

He served as U.S. ambassador to the Republics of Finland and Turkey in the Clinton and Bush Administrations and was principal deputy assistant to the vice president for national security affairs. In other assignment he has been chief of staff to Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott, special assistant to Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Robert Kimmitt and special assistant to Secretary of State George Shultz. His other assignments include the State Department Operations Center, Prague, Moscow, and Tel Aviv, where he was a member of the U.S. Middle East delegation to the West Bank/Gaza autonomy talks.

He has been awarded the Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service, the Presidential Distinguished Service Award, and several Department of State Superior Honor Awards. In January 2011 he was awarded the Legion d’Honneur by the French Government.

He received a bachelor's degree in history and government from Cornell University and a doctorate in U.S. diplomatic history from Yale University.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [7] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 123
                                                            [user_firstname] => John
                                                            [user_lastname] => Hamre
                                                            [nickname] => John Hamre
                                                            [user_nicename] => john-hamre
                                                            [display_name] => John Hamre
                                                            [user_email] => 3e@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2018-01-31 15:48:17
                                                            [user_description] => John Hamre was elected president and CEO of CSIS in January 2000. Before joining CSIS, he served as the 26th U.S. deputy secretary of defense. Prior to holding that post, he was the under secretary of defense (comptroller) from 1993 to 1997. As comptroller, Dr. Hamre was the principal assistant to the secretary of defense for the preparation, presentation, and execution of the defense budget and management improvement programs. In 2007, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates appointed Dr. Hamre to serve as chairman of the Defense Policy Board, and he served in that capacity for four secretaries of defense.

Before serving in the Department of Defense, Dr. Hamre worked for 10 years as a professional staff member of the Senate Armed Services Committee. During that time, he was primarily responsible for the oversight and evaluation of procurement, research, and development programs, defense budget issues, and relations with the Senate Appropriations Committee. From 1978 to 1984, Dr. Hamre served in the Congressional Budget Office, where he became its deputy assistant director for national security and international affairs. In that position, he oversaw analysis and other support for committees in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. Dr. Hamre received his Ph.D., with distinction, in 1978 from the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Washington, D.C., where his studies focused on international politics and economics and U.S. foreign policy. In 1972, he received his B.A., with high distinction, from Augustana College in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, emphasizing political science and economics. The following year he studied as a Rockefeller fellow at the Harvard Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [8] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 29
                                                            [user_firstname] => Kathleen
                                                            [user_lastname] => Hicks
                                                            [nickname] => Kathleen Hicks
                                                            [user_nicename] => kathleen-hicks
                                                            [display_name] => Kathleen Hicks
                                                            [user_email] => iii@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 20:58:53
                                                            [user_description] => Kathleen Hicks is senior vice president, Henry A. Kissinger Chair, and director of the International Security Program at CSIS. With over fifty resident staff and an extensive network of non-resident affiliates, the International Security Program undertakes one of the most ambitious research and policy agendas in the security field. Dr. Hicks is a frequent writer and lecturer on geopolitics, national security, and defense matters. She served in the Obama Administration as the principal deputy under secretary of defense for policy and the deputy under secretary of defense for strategy, plans, and forces. She led the development of the 2012 Defense Strategic Guidance and the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review. She also oversaw Department of Defense contingency and theater campaign planning. From 2006 to 2009, Dr. Hicks was a senior fellow in CSIS’s international security program. Prior to that, she spent almost thirteen years as a career official in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, rising from Presidential Management Intern to the Senior Executive Service.

Dr. Hicks is concurrently the Donald Marron Scholar at the Kissinger Center for Global Affairs, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. She serves on the Boards of Advisors for the Truman Center and SoldierStrong and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Dr. Hicks served on the National Commission on the Future of the Army and the Commission on the National Defense Strategy. She is the recipient of distinguished service awards from three Secretaries of Defense and a Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the 2011 DOD Senior Professional Women’s Association Excellence in Leadership Award, and the National Capital-Area Political Science Association’s 2018 Walter Beach Award, for strengthening the relationship between the worlds of political science and public service. She holds a Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an M.P.A. from the University of Maryland, and an A.B. magna cum laude from Mount Holyoke College.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [9] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 37
                                                            [user_firstname] => James
                                                            [user_lastname] => Jeffrey
                                                            [nickname] => James Jeffrey
                                                            [user_nicename] => james-jeffrey
                                                            [display_name] => James Jeffrey
                                                            [user_email] => rrr@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:37:00
                                                            [user_description] => Ambassador James Franklin Jeffrey currently serves as the Secretary of State’s Special Representative for Syria Engagement and the Special Envoy to the Global Coalition To Defeat ISIS. He is a senior American diplomat with experience in political, security, and energy issues in the Middle East, Turkey, Germany, and the Balkans.

He has held senior assignments in Washington, DC, and abroad, including as Deputy National Security Advisor (2007–2008); United States Ambassador to Iraq (2010–2012); United States Ambassador to Turkey (2008–2010); and United States Ambassador to Albania (2002–2004). In 2010 Jeffrey was appointed to the highest rank in the U.S. Foreign Service, Career Ambassador. From 1969 to 1976, Jeffrey was a U.S. Army infantry officer, with service in Germany and Vietnam.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [10] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 36
                                                            [user_firstname] => Paul
                                                            [user_lastname] => Lettow
                                                            [nickname] => Paul Lettow
                                                            [user_nicename] => paul-lettow
                                                            [display_name] => Paul Lettow
                                                            [user_email] => qqq@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:34:27
                                                            [user_description] => Dr. Paul V. Lettow is a lawyer in the government regulation group in the Washington, D.C. office of Jones Day. From 2007 to 2009, he served as the Senior Director for Strategic Planning on the National Security Council staff at the White House. Previously, Dr. Lettow was Senior Advisor to the Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs from 2006 to 2007. He is the author of Strengthening the Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime (Council on Foreign Relations, 2010), and Ronald Reagan and His Quest to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (Random House, 2005). Dr. Lettow received a J.D. from Harvard Law School, a D.Phil. in international relations from Oxford University, and an A.B. in history, summa cum laude, from Princeton University. He is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [11] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 34
                                                            [user_firstname] => Michael
                                                            [user_lastname] => Lumpkin
                                                            [nickname] => Michael Lumpkin
                                                            [user_nicename] => michael-lumpkin
                                                            [display_name] => Michael Lumpkin
                                                            [user_email] => ooo@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:25:36
                                                            [user_description] => Michael D. Lumpkin joined the team at Leidos Health as Vice President of Human Performance an Behavioral Health in December 2017. He is a former American Naval Officer and businessman who served as the Special Envoy and Coordinator of the Global Engagement Center at the U.S. Department of State until January 2017. From 2013 until 2016, he was the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict. During that time, he also served as the acting Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, the third-highest civilian job at the United States Department of Defense.

Lumpkin is considered an experienced crisis manager and turnaround expert. Prior to his current role he was tasked to overhaul U.S. government efforts to disrupt extremist propaganda, he led the DoD response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa, efforts to locate and return Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl, and the reorganization of the military’s broken POW/MIA program.

As a Navy SEAL, Lumpkin served nine operational tours, one commanding a Team, in counter-insurgency and counter-narcotics operations around the world, including in Iraq, Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa, the Philippines, and Central and South America.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [12] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 46
                                                            [user_firstname] => William J.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Lynn
                                                            [nickname] => William J Lynn
                                                            [user_nicename] => william-j-lynn
                                                            [display_name] => William J. Lynn
                                                            [user_email] => aaaa@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:32:56
                                                            [user_description] => William J. Lynn III is the Chief Executive Officer of Leonardo DRS. Leonardo is a European-based defense and aerospace conglomerate and DRS is its largest U.S. subsidiary with about $2 billion in revenue.

Mr. Lynn has had an extensive career in national security, both in government and in industry. In government, he has served two Presidents, five Secretaries of Defense and as an aide to Senator Edward Kennedy. In industry, he has worked as a senior executive for Raytheon and now Leonardo/DRS.

Prior to joining Leonardo/DRS in January 2012, Mr. Lynn served as the 30th United States Deputy Secretary of Defense from 2009 to 2011. Serving under Secretaries Robert Gates and Leon Panetta, he managed three million personnel and oversaw an annual budget of $700 billion. He also personally led the Department's efforts in cyber security, space strategy and energy policy.

From 2002 to 2009, Mr. Lynn was Senior Vice President of Government Operations and Strategy at the Raytheon Company. In this position, he directed strategic planning, oversaw merger and acquisition activities and supervised government relations.

Previously, he served as the Chief Financial Officer and Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) from 1997 to 2001. From 1993 to 1997, he led strategic planning for DoD as Director of Program Analysis and Evaluation. Mr. Lynn worked for Senator Ted Kennedy as counsel to the Senate Armed Services Committee from 1987 to 1993.

Mr. Lynn is a member of the Boards of the USO, the Atlantic Council, Marshall Legacy Institute, National Defense Industrial Association and the Center for a New American Security (CNAS). He has been recognized for numerous professional and service contributions, including four DoD Distinguished Public Service medals and the Distinguished Civilian Service Award from the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

His publications include a 2010 path-breaking article in Foreign Affairs on cyber security (“Defending a New Domain: The Pentagon’s New Cyberstrategy”). He also co-authored a book, Toward A More Effective Defense, and has published numerous articles in various professional journals and newspapers.

A graduate of Dartmouth College, Mr. Lynn holds a law degree from Cornell Law School and a Master's degree from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. He is married with two children.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [13] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 48
                                                            [user_firstname] => Kelly
                                                            [user_lastname] => Magsamen
                                                            [nickname] => Kelly Magsamen
                                                            [user_nicename] => kelly-magsamen
                                                            [display_name] => Kelly Magsamen
                                                            [user_email] => cccc@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:36:00
                                                            [user_description] => Kelly Magsamen is the vice president for National Security and International Policy at American Progress. Previously, she was the principal deputy assistant secretary of defense for Asian and Pacific Security Affairs and also performed the duties of assistant secretary of defense, where she was responsible for defense and security policy for all of Asia and served as principal adviser to the secretary of defense. In these roles, Magsamen shaped Department of Defense policy and strategy in the South China Sea and was responsible for strengthening and modernizing U.S. alliances and partnerships in the region. She was also integral to the development of U.S. strategy and policy in Afghanistan and South Asia.

Prior to her tenure at the Pentagon, Magsamen served on the National Security Council staff for two presidents and four national security advisers. As special assistant to the president and senior director for strategic planning from 2012 to 2014, she was responsible for long-term strategic planning and helped craft the 2015 U.S. National Security Strategy. From 2011 to 2012, she served as senior adviser for Middle East reform. As director for Iran from 2008 to 2011, she was responsible for coordination of U.S. policy on Iran, including diplomatic, economic, defense, and intelligence efforts.

Magsamen started her government career at the Department of State, where she worked on Iraq policy in the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs from 2005 to 2007 and served as special assistant and chief of staff to the counselor from 2007 to 2008.

Magsamen received her bachelor’s degree in international relations from American University and her master’s degree in strategic studies from Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [14] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 38
                                                            [user_firstname] => David
                                                            [user_lastname] => Petraeus
                                                            [nickname] => David Petraeus
                                                            [user_nicename] => david-petraeus
                                                            [display_name] => David Petraeus
                                                            [user_email] => sss@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:40:11
                                                            [user_description] => David Petraeus is a retired United States Army general and public official. He served as Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from September 6, 2011, until his resignation on November 9, 2012. Prior to his assuming the directorship of the CIA, Petraeus served 37 years in the United States Army. His last assignments in the Army were as commander of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and Commander, U.S. Forces – Afghanistan (USFOR-A) from July 4, 2010, to July 18, 2011. His other four-star assignments include serving as the 10th Commander, U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) from October 13, 2008, to June 30, 2010, and as Commanding General, Multi-National Force – Iraq (MNF-I) from February 10, 2007, to September 16, 2008. As commander of MNF-I, Petraeus oversaw all coalition forces in Iraq.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [15] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 32
                                                            [user_firstname] => Dan
                                                            [user_lastname] => Runde
                                                            [nickname] => Dan Runde
                                                            [user_nicename] => dan-runde
                                                            [display_name] => Dan Runde
                                                            [user_email] => mmm@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:13:19
                                                            [user_description] => Daniel F. Runde is senior vice president, director of the Project on Prosperity and Development, and holds the William A. Schreyer Chair in Global Analysis at CSIS. His work centers on leveraging American soft power instruments and the central roles of the private sector and good governance in creating a more free and prosperous world. Previously, he led the Foundations Unit for the Department of Partnerships & Advisory Service Operations at the International Finance Corporation. His work facilitated and supported over $20 million in new funding through partnerships with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, Kauffman Foundation, and Visa International, among other global private and corporate foundations.

Earlier, Mr. Runde was director of the Office of Global Development Alliances at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). He led the initiative by providing training, networks, staff, funds, and advice to establish and strengthen alliances, while personally consulting to 15 USAID missions in Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa. His efforts leveraged $4.8 billion through 100 direct alliances and 300 others through training and technical assistance. Mr. Runde began his career in financial services at Alex. Brown & Sons, Inc., in Baltimore and worked for both CitiBank and BankBoston in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He received an M.P.P. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and holds a B.A., cum laude, from Dartmouth College.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [16] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 41
                                                            [user_firstname] => David
                                                            [user_lastname] => Shedd
                                                            [nickname] => David Shedd
                                                            [user_nicename] => david-shedd
                                                            [display_name] => David Shedd
                                                            [user_email] => uuu@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:45:21
                                                            [user_description] => Mr. Shedd was named Acting Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency in August 2014 following four years service as Deputy Director. Until January 2015 he led the Defense Intelligence Enterprise workforce comprised of more than 16,500 military and civilian employees worldwide. This workforce spans the Defense Intelligence Enterprise within the Department of Defense with an intelligence mission and/or function, plus all their stakeholders involved in creating, sustaining and enhancing mission capacity.

Mr. Shedd served from May 2007 to August 2010 as the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) Deputy Director for Policy, Plans, and Requirements, where he was responsible for overseeing the formulation and implementation of major Intelligence Community (IC) policies across the full spectrum of issues, from information sharing and IC authorities to analytic standards, among others. In particular, he led the review of Executive Order 12333, the foundational U.S. intelligence policy, which was revised by President George W. Bush in July 2008. Additionally, Mr. Shedd developed and implemented a National Intelligence Strategy, published in August 2009 for the IC and led all strategic planning efforts to determine future intelligence priorities for the Community and the Nation.

From May 2005 to April 2007, Mr. Shedd served as Chief of Staff and, later, Acting Director of the Intelligence Staff to the Director of National Intelligence. Prior to the creation of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Mr. Shedd held intelligence policy positions at the National Security Council (NSC) from February 2001 to May 2005. He served as the NSC’s Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Intelligence Programs and Reform. Mr. Shedd has been directly involved in the implementation of intelligence reform stemming from the 9/11 Commission report in July 2004, the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, and the Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Commission’s report to the President in March 2005.

Between 1984 and 1993, Mr. Shedd served overseas in the U.S. Embassies in Costa Rica and Mexico. Mr. Shedd has also held a variety of senior management assignments at the Central Intelligence Agency, including Chief of Congressional Liaison.

Mr. Shedd is also on the Government Advisory Board of Dataminr, a social media “big data” company that broadly services the Federal Government.

Mr. Shedd holds a B.A. from Geneva College in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania and a M.A. from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in Latin American Studies. Mr. Shedd was born in Bolivia and grew up in Latin America.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
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                                                )

                                            [17] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 45
                                                            [user_firstname] => Kristen
                                                            [user_lastname] => Silverberg
                                                            [nickname] => Kristen Silverberg
                                                            [user_nicename] => kristen-silverberg
                                                            [display_name] => Kristen Silverberg
                                                            [user_email] => zzz@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:31:44
                                                            [user_description] => Ambassador Kristen Silverberg is a Managing Director at the Institute of International Finance, where she leads the Political Risk team. She also launched the IIF’s Innovations team, which focused on developments in digital finance.  She served in the George W. Bush Administration as U.S. Ambassador to the European Union from 2008 to 2009 and as Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs from 2005 to 2008.  Prior to her time at the State Department, she held senior positions at the White House, including Deputy Assistant to the President and Advisor to the Chief of Staff.  She previously served as Deputy Domestic Policy Advisor. 

Ambassador Silverberg served in 2003 in Baghdad, Iraq for which she received the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service.  She formerly practiced law at Williams and Connolly, LLP in Washington, DC and served as a law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and Judge David Sentelle of the U.S. Court of Appeals.  She attended Harvard College and the University of Texas School of Law, where she graduated with High Honors. 

Ambassador Silverberg serves on the Board of Directors of the CDC Foundation, the Board of Directors of the International Republican Institute, the Board of Directors of Vorbeck Materials, the Advisory Board of Beacon Global Strategies, the Advisory Board of the Texas National Security Review, and was recognized by the World Economic Forum in 2009 as a Young Global Leader.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [18] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 100
                                                            [user_firstname] => Michael
                                                            [user_lastname] => Singh
                                                            [nickname] => Michael Singh
                                                            [user_nicename] => michael-singh
                                                            [display_name] => Michael Singh
                                                            [user_email] => k@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-24 18:17:39
                                                            [user_description] => Michael Singh is the Lane-Swig Senior Fellow and managing director at The Washington Institute and a former senior director for Middle East affairs at the National Security Council.

During his tenure at the White House from 2005 to 2008, Mr. Singh was responsible for devising and coordinating U.S. national security policy toward the region stretching from Morocco to Iran, with a particular emphasis on Iran’s nuclear and regional activities, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Syria, and security cooperation in the broader Middle East. Previously, Mr. Singh served as special assistant to secretaries of state Condoleezza Rice and Colin Powell and at the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv.

Mr. Singh served as a Middle East advisor to the Romney presidential campaign from 2011-2012, and cochaired Mr. Romney’s State Department transition team in 2012. He served as an adjunct fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Security at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and as an economics instructor at Harvard College. Mr. Singh serves on the advisory boards of United Against Nuclear Iran and the Harvard International Review, and is a senior advisor at WestExec Advisors. He is also a member of the congressionally mandated Task Force on Extremism in Fragile States.

Mr. Singh has written extensively on the Middle East, broader US national security strategy, and the organization and management of the US national security apparatus. His writings have appeared in the Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, International Security, and elsewhere, and he has appeared as a commentator on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and other outlets.

As the Institute's managing director, Mr. Singh conducts policy research and participates in the public debate over the direction and content of U.S. Middle East policy. In addition, he works closely with Institute executive director Robert Satloff to strengthen the Institute's policy impact, develop new initiatives, and oversee its broader work.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [19] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 44
                                                            [user_firstname] => James G.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Stavridis
                                                            [nickname] => Jim Stavridis
                                                            [user_nicename] => jim-stavridis
                                                            [display_name] => James G. Stavridis
                                                            [user_email] => yyy@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:30:44
                                                            [user_description] => James G. Stavridis is a retired United States Navy admiral, currently an Operating Executive with The Carlyle Group and Chair of the Board of Counselors at McLarty Associates. In August 2018, he stepped down as the dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, a graduate school for international affairs. Stavridis serves as the chief international diplomacy and national security analyst for NBC News in New York. He is also chairman of the board of the U.S. Naval Institute and a Senior Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

Stavridis graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1976. While in the Navy, Stavridis served as the commander, U.S. Southern Command(2006 to 2009) and commander, U.S. European Command and NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe (2009 to 2013), the first Navy officer to have held these positions. Stavridis earned a Ph.D and Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University in 1984, where he won the Gullion Prize.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [20] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [user] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [ID] => 47
                                                            [user_firstname] => Christine E.
                                                            [user_lastname] => Wormuth
                                                            [nickname] => Christine E Wormuth
                                                            [user_nicename] => christine-e-wormuth
                                                            [display_name] => Christine E. Wormuth
                                                            [user_email] => bbbb@tnsr.org
                                                            [user_url] => 
                                                            [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:34:25
                                                            [user_description] => Christine Wormuth is director of the RAND International Security and Defense Policy Center. Wormuth is a frequent writer and speaker on foreign policy, national security, and homeland security issues. Prior to joining RAND, she was Under Secretary of Defense for Policy (USDP) at the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) from 2014 to 2016. In that role, she advised both Secretary Chuck Hagel and Secretary Ash Carter on the full range of regional and functional national security issues. As USDP she frequently represented DoD at the White House and spent considerable time on the counter-ISIS campaign, the rebalance to Asia, counterterrorism operations, and U.S. defense relations with countries in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

From 2012 to 2014, Wormuth was Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for strategy, plans, and forces, and led the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review. She served as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Defense at the National Security Council (NSC) from December 2010 until August 2012, where she was the primary liaison from NSC to the Pentagon on defense issues. She holds an M.P.P. from the University of Maryland.
                                                            [user_avatar] => 
                                                        )

                                                )

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            [post_date] => 2017-08-17 08:36:17
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                                                    [ID] => 11
                                                    [user_firstname] => Ryan
                                                    [user_lastname] => Evans
                                                    [nickname] => Ryan
                                                    [user_nicename] => ryan
                                                    [display_name] => Ryan Evans
                                                    [user_email] => Ryan.Evans@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-08-31 12:34:02
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                                                    [user_avatar] => 
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                                            [user] => Array
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                                                    [ID] => 22
                                                    [user_firstname] => William
                                                    [user_lastname] => Inboden
                                                    [nickname] => William Inboden
                                                    [user_nicename] => william-inboden
                                                    [display_name] => William Inboden
                                                    [user_email] => aaa@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 20:45:58
                                                    [user_description] => William Inboden joined the LBJ School faculty at the University of Texas at Austin after many years of working as a policymaker in Washington, D.C., and directing a foreign policy think tank overseas. He is the William Powers, Jr. Executive Director of the Clements Center for National Security and a Distinguished Scholar at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law. He is also a National Intelligence Council associate and is on the CIA Director’s Historical Review Panel. He previously served as senior director for strategic planning on the National Security Council, he worked on the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff and he served as a congressional staff member. Inboden’s think-tank experience includes the American Enterprise Institute and running the London-based Legatum Institute. He is a Council on Foreign Relations life member and a contributing editor to Foreign Policy magazine, and his commentary has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Foreign Affairs, The Weekly Standard, NPR, CNN and BBC. His classes, Ethics & International Relations and Presidential Decision-Making in National Security, have been selected in recent years as the "Best Class in the LBJ School." His current research includes American grand strategy, a history of Reagan Administration national security policy, and a history of totalitarian ideologies and religious intolerance.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [2] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 18
                                                    [user_firstname] => Megan G.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Oprea
                                                    [nickname] => Megan
                                                    [user_nicename] => megan
                                                    [display_name] => Megan G. Oprea
                                                    [user_email] => mgoprea@gmail.com
                                                    [user_url] => https://tnsr.org
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-09 06:48:55
                                                    [user_description] => Megan received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in French linguistic. Her dissertation explored how second-generation North African immigrants in France view French and Arabic, and how those views related to their national and religious identity.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [3] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 24
                                                    [user_firstname] => Van
                                                    [user_lastname] => Jackson
                                                    [nickname] => Van Jackson
                                                    [user_nicename] => van-jackson
                                                    [display_name] => Van Jackson
                                                    [user_email] => ccc@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 20:47:49
                                                    [user_description] => Van Jackson is an associate editor at the Texas National Security Review, a senior lecturer in international relations at Victoria University of Wellington, and a global fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. He is the author of On the Brink: Trump, Kim, and the Threat of Nuclear War (Cambridge University Press, 2018). The views expressed are solely those of the author.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [4] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 14
                                                    [user_firstname] => Stephen
                                                    [user_lastname] => Tankel
                                                    [nickname] => stephen.tankel
                                                    [user_nicename] => stephen-tankel
                                                    [display_name] => Stephen Tankel
                                                    [user_email] => stephen.tankel@warontherocks.com
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-03 14:21:57
                                                    [user_description] => Stephen Tankel is an associate professor at American University, an adjunct senior fellow at the Center for a New America Security, a senior editor and War on the Rocks, and the author of With Us and Against Us: How America’s Partners Help and Hinder the War on Terror.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [5] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 216
                                                    [user_firstname] => Galen
                                                    [user_lastname] => Jackson
                                                    [nickname] => Galen Jackson
                                                    [user_nicename] => galen-jackson
                                                    [display_name] => Galen Jackson
                                                    [user_email] => galen.jackson@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2018-10-02 14:50:29
                                                    [user_description] => Galen Jackson is an assistant professor of political science at Williams College where he teaches courses in international security, nuclear security, American foreign policy, the Middle East in international politics, and international relations theory. His work has been published in Security
Studies, International Security, and the Journal of Cold War Studies. He is currently working on a project that examines the superpower diplomacy of the Arab-Israeli conflict between the June 1967 war and the 1979 Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty. He received his Ph.D. in political science
from UCLA in 2016 and became an associate editor at TNSR in 2018.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [6] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 25
                                                    [user_firstname] => Autumn
                                                    [user_lastname] => Brewington
                                                    [nickname] => Autumn Brewington
                                                    [user_nicename] => autumn-brewington
                                                    [display_name] => Autumn Brewington
                                                    [user_email] => ddd@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 20:51:18
                                                    [user_description] => Autumn Brewington is an editor at Lawfare and a freelance writer in Washington. She was an editor at the Washington Post from 2001 to 2014 and ran the Wall Street Journal’s Think Tank blog from 2014 through 2016. A graduate of the Missouri School of Journalism, she also edits for the Texas National Security Review.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                )

                            [exclude] => 
                            [user_role] => 
                        )

                    [1] => Array
                        (
                            [acf_fc_layout] => wgt_authors
                            [title] => Editorial Board
                            [wgt_type] => manual
                            [users] => Array
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                                    [0] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 49
                                                    [user_firstname] => Francis J.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Gavin
                                                    [nickname] => Francis J Gavin
                                                    [user_nicename] => francis-j-gavin
                                                    [display_name] => Francis J. Gavin
                                                    [user_email] => dddd@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:55:44
                                                    [user_description] => Francis J. Gavin is the Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and the inaugural director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS. In 2013, Gavin was appointed the first Frank Stanton Chair in Nuclear Security Policy Studies and Professor of Political Science at MIT. Before joining MIT, he was the Tom Slick Professor of International Affairs and the Director of the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas. From 2005 until 2010, he directed The American Assembly’s multiyear, national initiative, The Next Generation Project: U.S. Global Policy and the Future of International Institutions. Gavin’s writings include Gold, Dollars, and Power: The Politics of International Monetary Relations, 1958-1971 (University of North Carolina Press, 2004) and Nuclear Statecraft: History and Strategy in America’s Atomic Age (Cornell University Press, 2012). 

He received a PhD and MA in History from the University of Pennsylvania, a Master of Studies in Modern European History from Oxford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Chicago. Gavin is an Associate of the Managing the Atom Program at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University, Senior Fellow of the Clements Program in History, Strategy, and Statecraft, a Distinguished Scholar at the Robert S. Strauss Center, a Senior Advisor to the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project at the Woodrow Wilson Center, and a life-member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [1] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 22
                                                    [user_firstname] => William
                                                    [user_lastname] => Inboden
                                                    [nickname] => William Inboden
                                                    [user_nicename] => william-inboden
                                                    [display_name] => William Inboden
                                                    [user_email] => aaa@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 20:45:58
                                                    [user_description] => William Inboden joined the LBJ School faculty at the University of Texas at Austin after many years of working as a policymaker in Washington, D.C., and directing a foreign policy think tank overseas. He is the William Powers, Jr. Executive Director of the Clements Center for National Security and a Distinguished Scholar at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law. He is also a National Intelligence Council associate and is on the CIA Director’s Historical Review Panel. He previously served as senior director for strategic planning on the National Security Council, he worked on the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff and he served as a congressional staff member. Inboden’s think-tank experience includes the American Enterprise Institute and running the London-based Legatum Institute. He is a Council on Foreign Relations life member and a contributing editor to Foreign Policy magazine, and his commentary has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Foreign Affairs, The Weekly Standard, NPR, CNN and BBC. His classes, Ethics & International Relations and Presidential Decision-Making in National Security, have been selected in recent years as the "Best Class in the LBJ School." His current research includes American grand strategy, a history of Reagan Administration national security policy, and a history of totalitarian ideologies and religious intolerance.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [2] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 50
                                                    [user_firstname] => Robert J.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Art
                                                    [nickname] => Robert Art
                                                    [user_nicename] => robert-art
                                                    [display_name] => Robert J. Art
                                                    [user_email] => eeee@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:57:45
                                                    [user_description] => Robert Art, the director of MIT's Seminar XXI Program, is Herter Professor of International Relations at Brandeis University and a senior fellow in the Security Studies Program at MIT's Center for International Studies. He has served as a consultant to the Secretary of Defense and the Central Intelligence Agency, and is currently a faculty associate of the National Intelligence Council. Professor Art's books include The TFX Decision: McNamara and the Military; Reorganizing America's Defense, with Samuel P. Huntington and Vincent Davis, eds.; U.S. Foreign Policy: The Search for a New Role with Seyom Brown, eds.; The United States and Coercive Diplomacy, with Patrick Cronin, eds.; Democracy and Counterterrorism, with Louise Richardson, eds.; A Grand Strategy for America; and America’s Grand Strategy and World Politics.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [3] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 51
                                                    [user_firstname] => Richard
                                                    [user_lastname] => Betts
                                                    [nickname] => Richard Betts
                                                    [user_nicename] => richard-betts
                                                    [display_name] => Richard Betts
                                                    [user_email] => ffff@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:58:39
                                                    [user_description] => Richard K. Betts is the Arnold A. Saltzman Professor of War and Peace Studies in the political science department, Director of the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, and Director of the International Security Policy program in the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He was Director of National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations for four years and is now an adjunct Senior Fellow there. Betts was a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution until 1990 and adjunct Lecturer at the Johns Hopkins University's Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.  He also served at different times on the Harvard faculty as Lecturer in Government and as Visiting Professor of Government. Born in 1947, he received his BA, MA, and PhD in Government from Harvard University.  

A former staff member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, the National Security Council, and the Mondale Presidential Campaign, Betts has been an occasional consultant to the National Intelligence Council and Departments of State and Defense, served on the Military Advisory Panel for three Directors of Central Intelligence in the 1990s and later on the External Advisory Board for the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, and was a member of the National Commission on Terrorism. He lectures frequently at schools such as the National War College, Foreign Service Institute, and service academies. He served briefly as an officer in the U.S. Army.

Betts' first book, Soldiers, Statesmen, and Cold War Crises (Harvard University Press, 1977) was issued in a second edition by Columbia University Press in 1991. He is author of two other Columbia University Press books: Enemies of Intelligence (2007) and American Force (2012); three books published by the Brookings Institution: Surprise Attack (1982), Nuclear Blackmail and Nuclear Balance (1987), and Military Readiness (1995); coauthor and editor of three other Brookings books: The Irony of Vietnam (1979), Nonproliferation and U.S. Foreign Policy (1980), and Cruise Missiles (1981); editor of Conflict After the Cold War, Fourth Edition (Pearson, 2013); and coeditor of Paradoxes of Strategic Intelligence (Cass, 2003). Betts has published numerous articles on foreign policy, military strategy, intelligence, conventional forces, nuclear weapons, arms trade, collective security, strategic issues in Asia and Europe, and other subjects in professional journals. His writings won five prizes, and he received the International Studies Association’s ISSS Distinguished Scholar Award in 2005 and MIT’s Doolittle Award in 2012.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [4] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 52
                                                    [user_firstname] => John
                                                    [user_lastname] => Bew
                                                    [nickname] => John Bew
                                                    [user_nicename] => john-bew
                                                    [display_name] => John Bew
                                                    [user_email] => gggg@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:59:38
                                                    [user_description] => I am Professor in History and Foreign Policy at the War Studies Department at King’s College London, where I am leading a major new project called the Grand Strategy Programme. The core aim of the Grand Strategy Programme is knowledge transfer: to bring more historical and strategic expertise to statecraft, diplomacy and foreign policy. It will also investigate the origins and future of the idea of World Order, with the support of a grant from the Leverhulme Trust. (For more information contact maeve.ryan@kcl.ac.uk)
In 2015, I was awarded the Philip Leverhulme Prize for Politics and International Studies, which ‘recognises the achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising’. In 2013-14, I was the youngest ever holder of the Henry A. Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy at the John W. Kluge Center at the US Library of Congress. In 2014-15, I held a Leverhulme Trust Scholarship in order to complete my history of the concept of realpolitik. I was formerly co-Director of International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence, having arrived at King’s in 2010.
I am the author of five books and numerous academic articles, which are bound together by an interest in history and contemporary statecraft. My fifth book, Citizen Clem: A Life of Attlee (Riverrun and Oxford University Press), was published in September 2016 and has been described as ‘easily the best single-volume, cradle-to-grave life of Clement Attlee yet written’. My fourth book Realpolitik: A History, was published by Oxford University Press in January 2016, and was widely reviewed widely in the international media including the Financial Times, Prospect, New Statesman, National Interest and Wall Street Journal, as well as the top peer-reviewed journals in the field.
My third book, Castlereagh: Enlightenment, War & Tyranny (Oxford University Press), was the lead review in the Times Literary Supplement, and a book of the year in The Wall Street Journal, The Spectator, Sunday Telegraph, Total Politics, and BBC Parliament’s Booktalk. Previous books include a co-written work, Talking to Terrorists: Making Peace in Northern Ireland and the Basque Country (Columbia University Press, 2009), which was named in Foreign Policy magazine’s Global Thinkers Book Club and as the best in its category in the journal, Perspectives on Terrorism.
I am a contributing writer at the New Statesman, and cover the release of state papers for the Irish Times. I have also written for the Times Literary Supplement, American Interest, National Interest, New Republic, Literary Review, and History Today. I am currently working with the think tank Policy Exchange, where I am leading a new academic commission examining the question of Britain in the World. The project was launched by the UK Secretary of State for Defence in May 2016 and aims to bring more academic expertise into the policy making process.
From 2007-10, I was Lecturer in Modern British History, Harris Fellow and Director of Studies at Peterhouse, Cambridge University, where I was previously a Junior Research Fellow. I completed my education at Pembroke College, Cambridge where I was a Foundation Scholar and a Thornton Scholar and attained a first class BA in History. I won the Member’s Prize for the best MPhil in Historical Studies, before going on to complete my PhD in 2006.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [5] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 88
                                                    [user_firstname] => Nigel
                                                    [user_lastname] => Biggar
                                                    [nickname] => Nigel Biggar
                                                    [user_nicename] => nigel-biggar
                                                    [display_name] => Nigel Biggar
                                                    [user_email] => tt@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:51:56
                                                    [user_description] => Nigel Biggar holds a B.A. (Hons) in Modern History from the University of Oxford; a Master of Christian Studies from Regent College, Vancouver, Canada; and an M.A. in Religious Studies, and a Ph.D. in Christian Theology, from the University of Chicago.

Among his current research interests are: the ethics of nationalism and empire; the ethics of individual rights and of jurisprudence about them; ‘just war’ reasoning; the principle of double effect and the ethics of killing; the concept of proportionality; the moral vocation of universities; and the relationship between (Christian) religious concepts and moral life.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [6] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 144
                                                    [user_firstname] => Philip
                                                    [user_lastname] => Bobbitt
                                                    [nickname] => Philip Bobbitt
                                                    [user_nicename] => philip-bobbitt
                                                    [display_name] => Philip Bobbitt
                                                    [user_email] => 5b@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2018-02-15 14:52:21
                                                    [user_description] => Philip Bobbitt is Herbert Wechsler Professor of Federal Jurisprudence and Director of the Center on National Security, Columbia Law School and Distinguished Senior Lecturer at the University of Texas.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [7] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 9
                                                    [user_firstname] => Hal
                                                    [user_lastname] => Brands
                                                    [nickname] => Hal.Brands
                                                    [user_nicename] => hal-brands
                                                    [display_name] => Hal Brands
                                                    [user_email] => hal@tsnr.com
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-08-27 10:08:13
                                                    [user_description] => Hal Brands is a Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor of Global Affairs at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He is the author or editor of several books, including Making the Unipolar Moment: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Rise of the Post-Cold War Order (2016), What Good is Grand Strategy? Power and Purpose in American Statecraft from Harry S. Truman to George W. Bush (2014), Latin America's Cold War (2010), From Berlin to Baghdad: America's Search for Purpose in the Post-Cold War World (2008), and The Power of the Past: History and Statecraft (co-edited with Jeremi Suri, 2015).

He was a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow from 2015 to 2016. He has also consulted with a range of government offices and agencies in the intelligence and national security communities.

He received his BA from Stanford University (2005) and his PhD from Yale University (2009). He previously worked as an assistant and associate professor at Duke University's Sanford School of Public Policy, and as a researcher at the Institute for Defense Analyses.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [8] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 107
                                                    [user_firstname] => Joshua W.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Busby
                                                    [nickname] => Josh Busby
                                                    [user_nicename] => josh-busby
                                                    [display_name] => Joshua W. Busby
                                                    [user_email] => z@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-30 16:23:07
                                                    [user_description] => Joshua Busby is a distinguished scholar at the Strauss Center, nonresident fellow with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and a senior research fellow at the Center for Climate & Security. Dr. Busby has published widely on climate change, global health, transnational advocacy movements and U.S. foreign policy for various think tanks and academic journals, including International Security, International Studies Quarterly, Security Studies and Perspectives on Politics. His first book, “Moral Movements and Foreign Policy,” was published by Cambridge University Press in 2010. His second book, “AIDS Drugs for All: Social Movements and Market Transformations,” with co-author Ethan Kapstein, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2013 and won the 2014 Don K. Price Award (the American Political Science Association’s award for the best book on science, technology and environmental politics). He was one of the lead researchers on a five-year, $7.6 million project funded by the Department of Defense called “Climate Change and African Political Stability” (CCAPS). He is the principal investigator of another DOD-funded project, “Complex Emergencies and Political Stability in Asia” (CEPSA) — a three-year, $1.9 million grant. Dr. Busby is a life member in the Council on Foreign Relations. He received his Ph.D. in political science in 2004 from Georgetown University.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [9] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 53
                                                    [user_firstname] => Robert
                                                    [user_lastname] => Chesney
                                                    [nickname] => Robert Chesney
                                                    [user_nicename] => robert-chesney
                                                    [display_name] => Robert Chesney
                                                    [user_email] => hhhh@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:03:20
                                                    [user_description] => Bobby Chesney holds the James Baker Chair and also serves as the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Texas School of Law. In addition, he is the Director of the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, a University-wide research unit bridging across disciplines to improve understanding of international security issues.

In 2009, Professor Chesney served in the Justice Department in connection with the Detention Policy Task Force created by Executive Order 13493. He also previously served the Intelligence Community as an associate member of the Intelligence Science Board and as a member of the Advanced Technology Board. In addition to his current positions at the University of Texas, he is  a member of the American Law Institute, and a senior editor for the Journal of National Security Law & Policy, and a former non-resident Senior Fellow of the Brookings Institution.

Professor Chesney is a co-founder and contributor to www.lawfareblog.com, the leading source for analysis, commentary, and news relating to law and national security. In addition to his blogging at Lawfare, those interested in national security law should consider following Professor Chesney on Twitter (@bobbychesney) as well as subscribing to the National Security Law Podcast (which he co-hosts with his colleague Steve Vladeck). Professor Chesney's scholarship focuses on U.S. national security policies and institutions, encompassing both domestic and international law issues. His articles may be downloaded from SSRN here.

Professor Chesney is a magna cum laude graduate of both Texas Christian University and Harvard Law School. After law school he clerked for the Honorable Lewis A. Kaplan of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and the Honorable Robert D. Sack of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He then practiced with the firm Davis Polk & Wardwell in New York (litigation), before beginning his academic career with Wake Forest University School of Law. There he received a teacher of the year award from the student body in one year, and from the school's dean in another. In 2008 he came to the University of Texas School of Law as a visiting professor, and then joined UT on a permanent basis in 2009. He became the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in 2011.

Professor Chesney teaches a variety of courses, including: Constitutional Law, National Security Law, Foundations of Cybersecurity: Law, Institutions, and Policy; Law of the Intelligence Community; History of U.S. Counterterrorism Law & Policy: 1970 to Present; Evidence, Civil Procedure, and an array of seminars. He is from San Antonio.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [10] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 54
                                                    [user_firstname] => Eliot
                                                    [user_lastname] => Cohen
                                                    [nickname] => Eliot Cohen
                                                    [user_nicename] => eliot-cohen
                                                    [display_name] => Eliot Cohen
                                                    [user_email] => iiii@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:03:48
                                                    [user_description] => Eliot Cohen is Robert E. Osgood Professor at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He directs the strategic studies program at SAIS and the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies, which he founded. He has twice won the SAIS Excellence in Teaching Award and has extensive experience in executive education, including serving as an adjunct professor at the US Army War College.

A 1977 graduate of Harvard College, he received his PhD there in political science in 1982.  From 1982 to 1985 he was Assistant Professor of Government at Harvard, and Assistant Dean of Harvard College. In 1985 he became a member of the Strategy Department of the United States Naval War College. In February 1990 he joined the Policy Planning Staff of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and in July of that year he was appointed professor of strategic studies at SAIS.

From April 2007 through January 2009 he served as Counselor of the Department of State. A principal officer of the Department, he had special responsibility for advising the Secretary on Iraq, Afghanistan, Iran, Pakistan, and Russia, as well as general strategic issues. He represented the Department of State in interagency coordination with senior National Security Council staff, Department of Defense, and intelligence community officials on a number of issues, including the Syrian/North Korean reactor crisis of 2007.

Eliot Cohen is the author of The Big Stick: The Limits of Soft Power and the Necessity of Military Force (2017), Conquered into Liberty: Two Centuries of Battles along the Great Warpath that made the American Way of War (2011), Supreme Command:  Soldiers, Statesmen, and Leadership in Wartime  (2002). His other books are Commandos and Politicians (1978) and Citizens and Soldiers (1985). He is, as well, co-author of Military Misfortunes: The Anatomy of Failure in War (1990), Revolution in Warfare? Air Power in the Persian Gulf (1995), and Knives, Tanks, and Missiles: Israel’s Security Revolution (1998), and co-editor of Strategy in the Contemporary World (2002) and War over Kosovo  (2001). From 1991 to 1993 he directed and edited the official study of air power in the 1991 war with Iraq. For his leadership of The Gulf War Air Power Survey, which included eleven book-length reports, he received the Air Force’s decoration for exceptional civilian service. His articles have appeared in numerous scholarly and popular journals, he publishes often in national newspapers such as the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and New York Times and is a contributing editor at The Atlantic.

In 1982 he was commissioned as a military intelligence officer in the United States Army Reserve. In the past he has served as a member of the Defense Policy Advisory Board and the National Security Advisory Panel of the National Intelligence Council, and of the Council of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, and of the Committee on Studies of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is an Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [11] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 55
                                                    [user_firstname] => Audrey
                                                    [user_lastname] => Kurth Cronin
                                                    [nickname] => Audrey Kurth Cronin
                                                    [user_nicename] => audrey-kurth-cronin
                                                    [display_name] => Audrey Kurth Cronin
                                                    [user_email] => jjjj@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:05:04
                                                    [user_description] => Audrey Kurth Cronin joined the faculty of American University’s School of International Service in August 2016. Her previous position was Director of the Center for Security Policy Studies, and Director of the International Security Program at George Mason University. Before that, she was a faculty member and director of the core course on War and Statecraft at the U.S. National War College (2007-2011). Professor Cronin’s career has combined academic positions and government service. She came to the war college from Oxford University (Nuffield College), where she was Academic Director of Studies for the Oxford/Leverhulme Programme on the Changing Character of War (2005-2007). Before that, she was Specialist in Terrorism at the Congressional Research Service, advising Members of Congress in the aftermath of 9/11. She has also served in the U.S. Executive branch, including in the Office of the Secretary of Defense for Policy; the Office of the Secretary of the Navy; and the American Embassy in Moscow. She often consults at senior levels of the U.S. government. Professor Cronin is widely published on strategy and nonstate actors. Her last book, which The New Yorker called "a landmark study," was How Terrorism Ends: Understanding the Decline and Demise of Terrorist Campaigns (Princeton University Press). It was recently translated into Chinese and Arabic. She regularly writes for academic and general interest audiences, in a range of journals including International Security and Foreign Affairs, as well as on-line venues and blogs. She also does media interviews for prominent national and international outlets. In 2015 she was named Australia’s Keogh Chair and traveled throughout the country speaking about the future of conflict, innovation and technology. Professor Cronin has repeatedly spoken at the World Economic Forum (where she was Chairman of the Global Agenda Council on Terrorism), the Council on Foreign Relations (where she is a member), the IISS (London), and many other national and international venues. Her forthcoming book, to be published by Oxford University Press in 2019, places military and terrorist innovation into broad historical context, then explores the risks and opportunities of 21st century emerging technologies.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [12] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 56
                                                    [user_firstname] => Theo
                                                    [user_lastname] => Farrell
                                                    [nickname] => Theo Farrell
                                                    [user_nicename] => theo-farrell
                                                    [display_name] => Theo Farrell
                                                    [user_email] => llll@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:06:17
                                                    [user_description] => Theo Farrell is professor and executive dean of law, humanities, and the arts at the University of Wollongong, Australia. He was previously professor of war in the modern world and head of the Department of War Studies at King’s College London. He is a fellow of the U.K. Academy of Social Sciences and former president of the British International Studies Association.

Professor Farrell is the author of Unwinnable: Britain’s War in Afghanistan, 2001–2014 (Penguin Random House, 2017), which was shortlisted for the RUSI Duke of Wellington Medal for Military History and the British Army Military Book of the Year. It was also named as a book of the year in the Times and the Evening Standard.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [13] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 57
                                                    [user_firstname] => Peter D.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Feaver
                                                    [nickname] => Peter D Feaver
                                                    [user_nicename] => peter-d-feaver
                                                    [display_name] => Peter D. Feaver
                                                    [user_email] => mmmm@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:06:58
                                                    [user_description] => Peter D. Feaver (Ph.D., Harvard, 1990) is a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Duke University. He is Director of the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS) and also Director of the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy (AGS). Feaver is author of Armed Servants: Agency, Oversight, and Civil-Military Relations (Harvard Press, 2003) and of Guarding the Guardians: Civilian Control of Nuclear Weapons in the United States (Cornell University Press, 1992). He is co-author, with Christopher Gelpi and Jason Reifler, of Paying the Human Costs of War (Princeton University Press, 2009), co-author, with Susan Wasiolek and Anne Crossman, of Getting the Most Out of College (Ten Speed Press, 2008), and co-author, with Christopher Gelpi, of Choosing Your Battles: American Civil-Military Relations and the Use of Force (Princeton University Press, 2004). He is co-editor, with Richard H. Kohn, of Soldiers and Civilians: The Civil-Military Gap and American National Security (MIT Press, 2001). He has published numerous other monographs, scholarly articles, book chapters, and policy pieces on American foreign policy, public opinion, nuclear proliferation, civil-military relations, information warfare, and U.S. national security. He is a member of the Aspen Strategy Group and blogs at Elephants in the Room on ForeignPolicy.com. In 1993-94, Feaver served as Director for Defense Policy and Arms Control on the National Security Council at the White House where his responsibilities included the national security strategy review, counterproliferation policy, regional nuclear arms control, and other defense policy issues. From June 2005 to July 2007, Feaver was on leave to be Special Advisor for Strategic Planning and Institutional Reform on the National Security Council Staff at the White House where his responsibilities included the national security strategy, regional strategy reviews, and other political-military issues.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [14] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 93
                                                    [user_firstname] => Rosemary
                                                    [user_lastname] => Foot
                                                    [nickname] => Rosemary Foot
                                                    [user_nicename] => rosemary-foot
                                                    [display_name] => Rosemary Foot
                                                    [user_email] => zz@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-23 16:49:24
                                                    [user_description] => Rosemary Foot was elected to an Emeritus Fellowship of St Antony’s College in October 2014. She is a Senior Research Fellow at Oxford’s Department of Politics and International Relations and a Research Associate at the Oxford China Centre. Previously Professor of International Relations, and the John Swire Senior Research Fellow at St Antony’s College, she has been a Fellow of the College since 1990. She was Senior Tutor from 2003-2005, and was Acting Warden of the College from January-October 2012. In 2014, she held the Visiting Sir Howard Kippenberger Chair in Strategic Studies at the University of Victoria in Wellington, New Zealand, and a Visiting Fellowship at the Nobel Institute, Oslo, Norway.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [15] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 58
                                                    [user_firstname] => Taylor
                                                    [user_lastname] => Fravel
                                                    [nickname] => Taylor Fravel
                                                    [user_nicename] => taylor-fravel
                                                    [display_name] => Taylor Fravel
                                                    [user_email] => nnnn@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:07:48
                                                    [user_description] => M. Taylor Fravel is the Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science and member of the Security Studies Program at MIT. Taylor is a graduate of Middlebury College and Stanford University, where he received his PhD. He has been a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University, a Predoctoral Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, a Fellow with the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program and a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He also has graduate degrees from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the International Studies Quarterly, Security Studies, Journal of Strategic Studies, and The China Quarterly, and is a member of the board of directors for the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations. He is also the Principal Investigator of the Maritime Awareness Project.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [16] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 59
                                                    [user_firstname] => Lawrence
                                                    [user_lastname] => Freedman
                                                    [nickname] => Lawrence Freedman
                                                    [user_nicename] => lawrence-freedman
                                                    [display_name] => Lawrence Freedman
                                                    [user_email] => oooo@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:09:43
                                                    [user_description] => Sir Lawrence Freedman has been Professor of War Studies at King's College London since 1982, and Vice-Principal since 2003. He was educated at Whitley Bay Grammar School and the Universities of Manchester, York and Oxford. Before joining King's he held research appointments at Nuffield College Oxford, IISS and the Royal Institute of International Affairs. Elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1995 and awarded the CBE (Commander of the British Empire) in 1996, he was appointed Official Historian of the Falklands Campaign in 1997.

Freedman was awarded the KCMG (Knight Commander of St Michael and St George) in 2003. He was appointed in June 2009 to serve as a member of the official inquiry into Britain and the 2003 Iraq War.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [17] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 60
                                                    [user_firstname] => James
                                                    [user_lastname] => Goldgeier
                                                    [nickname] => James Goldgeier
                                                    [user_nicename] => james-goldgeier
                                                    [display_name] => James Goldgeier
                                                    [user_email] => pppp@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:11:14
                                                    [user_description] => James Goldgeier is a visiting senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and professor of international relations at the School of International Service at American University, where he served as dean from 2011 to 2017. He holds the 2018-19 Library of Congress U.S.-Russia Chair at the John W. Kluge Center. Previously, he was a professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University, where from 2001 to 2005 he directed the Elliott School’s Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies. He also taught at Cornell University and he has held a number of public policy appointments, including director for Russian, Ukrainian and Eurasian affairs on the National Security Council staff, Whitney Shepardson senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, Henry A. Kissinger chair at the Library of Congress, and Edward Teller national fellow at the Hoover Institution. In addition, he has held appointments at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Brookings Institution, and the Center for International Security and Cooperation.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [18] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 90
                                                    [user_firstname] => Michael J.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Green
                                                    [nickname] => Michael J Green
                                                    [user_nicename] => michael-j-green
                                                    [display_name] => Michael J. Green
                                                    [user_email] => vv@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:54:09
                                                    [user_description] => Michael Jonathan Green is senior vice president for Asia and Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and director of Asian Studies at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He served on the staff of the National Security Council (NSC) from 2001 through 2005, first as director for Asian affairs with responsibility for Japan, Korea, Australia, and New Zealand, and then as special assistant to the president for national security affairs and senior director for Asia, with responsibility for East Asia and South Asia. Before joining the NSC staff, he was a senior fellow for East Asian security at the Council on Foreign Relations, director of the Edwin O. Reischauer Center and the Foreign Policy Institute and assistant professor at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University, research staff member at the Institute for Defense Analyses, and senior adviser on Asia in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He also worked in Japan on the staff of a member of the National Diet.

Dr. Green is also a nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute in Sydney, Australia, a distinguished scholar at the Asia Pacific Institute in Tokyo, and professor by special appointment at Sophia University in Tokyo. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Aspen Strategy Group, the America Australia Leadership Dialogue, the advisory boards of Radio Free Asia and the Center for a New American Security, and the editorial boards of the Washington Quarterly and the Journal of Unification Studies in Korea. He also serves as a trustee at the Asia Foundation, senior adviser at the Asia Group, and associate of the U.S. Intelligence Community. Dr. Green has authored numerous books and articles on East Asian security, including most recently, By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783 (Columbia University Press, 2017). He received his master’s and doctoral degrees from SAIS and did additional graduate and postgraduate research at Tokyo University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his bachelor’s degree in history from Kenyon College with highest honors. He holds a black belt in Iaido (sword) and has won international prizes on the great highland bagpipe.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [19] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 87
                                                    [user_firstname] => Kelly M.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Greenhill
                                                    [nickname] => Kelly M Greenhill
                                                    [user_nicename] => kelly-m-greenhill
                                                    [display_name] => Kelly M. Greenhill
                                                    [user_email] => ss@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:50:06
                                                    [user_description] => Kelly M. Greenhill's research focuses on foreign and defense policy; the politics of information; the use of military force; and what are frequently called "new security challenges," including civil wars, (counter-) insurgencies, the use of migration as a weapon, and international crime as a challenge to domestic governance. In addition to her Ph.D. from M.I.T., Greenhill holds an S.M. from M.I.T., a C.S.S. from Harvard University, and a B.A. (with distinction and highest honors) from the University of California at Berkeley. Outside of the Department, Greenhill serves as Research Fellow and as Chair of the Conflict, Security and Public Policy Working Group at Harvard University's Belfer Center and as Associate Editor of the journal International Security.

Greenhill is author of Weapons of Mass Migration: Forced Displacement, Coercion and Foreign Policy (Cornell Studies in Security Affairs), which won the 2011 International Studies Association's Best Book of the Year Award; and co-author and co-editor (with P. Andreas) of Sex, Drugs and Body Counts: The Politics of Numbers in Global Crime and Conflict (Cornell University Press); (with R. Art) of the eighth edition of The Use of Force: Military Power and International Politics (R&L); and (with P. Krause) of Coercion: The Power to Hurt in International Politics (Oxford University Press, in press). Her research has also appeared in a variety of other venues, including the journals International Security, International Studies Quarterly, Security Studies, Civil Wars, European Law Journal and International Migration; media outlets such as the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Foreign Affairs and the British Broadcasting Company; and in briefs prepared for argument before the U.S. Supreme Court and for use by other organs of the U.S. government. She is currently completing a new book, a cross-national study that explores why, when, and under what conditions, "extra-factual" sources of political information—such as rumors, conspiracy theories, myths and propaganda—materially influence the development and conduct of states' foreign and defense policies. The book is provisionally entitled Fear and Present Danger: Extra-factual Sources of Threat Conception and Proliferation.

Greenhill's research has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the Social Science Research Council, the MacArthur Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the Eisenhower Foundation and the Neubauer Foundation. In October 2017, it was announced that Greenhill was chosen as winner of the 2018 ISSS Emerging Scholar Award (to be bestowed in April 2018). Outside of academia, Greenhill has served as a consultant to the Ford Foundation, the World Bank and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR); as a defense program analyst for the U.S. Department of Defense; and as an economic policy intern in the Office of then Senator John F. Kerry. She sits on the editorial boards of Sage Publications and of the journals Security Studies, the Journal of Global Security Studies and the Texas National Security Review. Before coming to Tufts, Greenhill held pre- or post-doctoral fellowships at Harvard University's Olin Institute for Strategic Studies and Belfer Center, at Stanford University's Center for International Security and Cooperation, and at Columbia University's Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [20] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 101
                                                    [user_firstname] => Beatrice
                                                    [user_lastname] => Heuser
                                                    [nickname] => Beatrice Heuser
                                                    [user_nicename] => beatrice-heuser
                                                    [display_name] => Beatrice Heuser
                                                    [user_email] => l@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-24 18:21:02
                                                    [user_description] => Beatrice Heuser is a graduate of the universities of London (BA from Bedford College; MA from the LSE) and Oxford (St Antony’s College; St John’s College, graduated with DPhil). She holds a higher doctorate (Habilitation) from the University of Marburg. She has taught at King’s College London at the Department of War Studies, and at the University of Reading, and has taught at or held visiting professorships at several Parisian universities, the universities of Reims and Potsdam, at Sciences Po’ Paris and Reims, at the University of Rome III, at the Bundeswehr University near Munich and at the Russian Foreign Ministry’s university MGIMO. She spent a year at NATO Headquarters as a Consultant/Intern, and has worked as Director of Studies of the German Bundeswehr’s military history research office. She has been affiliated to/currently serving on academic advisory boards of several research institutes, including the French Institute of International Affairs (IFRI), the Royal United Services Institute, Chatham House (RIIA), the German Institute for Contemporary History, and the French government’s strategic studies think tank IRSEM.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [21] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 61
                                                    [user_firstname] => Michael C.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Horowitz
                                                    [nickname] => Michael C Horowitz
                                                    [user_nicename] => michael-c-horowitz
                                                    [display_name] => Michael C. Horowitz
                                                    [user_email] => qqqq@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:12:11
                                                    [user_description] => Michael C. Horowitz is a professor of political science and the associate director of Perry World House at the University of Pennsylvania. He recently received the 2017 Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, presented annually to a scholar under age 40 who is judged to have made the most significant contribution to the study of international relations and peace research. Professor Horowitz is the co-author of the book, Why Leaders Fight, and his award-winning first book, The Diffusion of Military Power: Causes and Consequences for International Politics. His research interests include technology and global politics, military innovation, the role of leaders in international politics, and forecasting. He has published in a wide array of peer reviewed journals, as well as more popular outlets such as the New York Times and Politico. Professor Horowitz previously worked for the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Policy in the Department of Defense. He is affiliated with the Foreign Policy Research Institute, the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and the Center for a New American Security. He is also a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He has held fellowships at the Weatherhead Center, Olin Institute, and Belfer Center at Harvard, where he received his PhD in Government. Professor Horowitz received his BA in political science from Emory University. You can find him on Twitter @mchorowitz.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [22] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 62
                                                    [user_firstname] => Richard H.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Immerman
                                                    [nickname] => Richard H Immerman
                                                    [user_nicename] => richard-h-immerman
                                                    [display_name] => Richard H. Immerman
                                                    [user_email] => rrrr@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:14:02
                                                    [user_description] => Richard H. Immerman is Edward Buthusiem Distinguished Faculty Fellow in History and Marvin Wachman Director of the Center for the Study of Force and Diplomacy at Temple University. The recipient of Temple’s Paul Eberman Faculty Research Award, the University of Hawaii’s Board of Regents Excellence in Research Award, and a former president of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations, his most recent books are Empire for Liberty; The Hidden Hand; and Understanding the U.S. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Immerman served as Assistant Deputy Director of National Intelligence, held the Francis W. De Serio Chair in Strategic Intelligence at the United States Army War College, and currently chairs the State Department's Historical Advisory Committee.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [23] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 91
                                                    [user_firstname] => Robert
                                                    [user_lastname] => Jervis
                                                    [nickname] => Robert Jervis
                                                    [user_nicename] => robert-jervis
                                                    [display_name] => Robert Jervis
                                                    [user_email] => sss1@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-23 00:02:44
                                                    [user_description] => Robert Jervis (Ph.D., California at Berkeley, 1968) is the Adlai E. Stevenson Professor of International Politics and has been a member of the Columbia political science department since 1980. He has also held professorial appointments at the University of California at Los Angeles (1974-1980) and Harvard University (1968-1974). In 2000-2001, he served as President of the American Political Science Association. Professor Jervis is co-editor of the "Cornell Studies in Security Affairs," a series published by Cornell University Press, and a member of numerous editorial review boards for scholarly journals. His publications include Perception and Misperception in International Politics, The Meaning of the Nuclear Revolution, System Effects: Complexity in Political and Social Life, American Foreign Policy in a New Era, and Why Intelligence Fails: Lessons from the Fall of the Shah and Iraqi WMD, and several edited volumes and numerous articles in scholarly journals. His latest book is How Statesmen Think: The Psychology of International Politics.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [24] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 42
                                                    [user_firstname] => Colin
                                                    [user_lastname] => Kahl
                                                    [nickname] => Colin Kahl
                                                    [user_nicename] => colin-kahl
                                                    [display_name] => Colin Kahl
                                                    [user_email] => vvv@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:22:43
                                                    [user_description] => Colin H. Kahl is co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation, the inaugural Steven C. Házy Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and a Professor, by courtesy, in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. He is also a Strategic Consultant to the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement.

From October 2014 to January 2017, he was Deputy Assistant to the President and National Security Advisor to the Vice President. In that position, he served as a senior advisor to President Obama and Vice President Biden on all matters related to U.S. foreign policy and national security affairs, and represented the Office of the Vice President as a standing member of the National Security Council Deputies’ Committee. From February 2009 to December 2011, Dr. Kahl was the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for the Middle East at the Pentagon. In this capacity, he served as the senior policy advisor to the Secretary of Defense for Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Yemen, and six other countries in the Levant and Persian Gulf region. In June 2011, he was awarded the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service by Secretary Robert Gates. 

From 2007 to 2017 (when not serving in the U.S. government), Dr. Kahl was an assistant and associate professor in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. From 2007 to 2009 and 2012 to 2014, he was also a Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), a nonpartisan Washington, DC-based think tank. From 2000 to 2007, he was an assistant professor of political science at the University of Minnesota. In 2005-2006, Dr. Kahl took leave from the University of Minnesota to serve as a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, where he worked on issues related to counterinsurgency, counterterrorism, and responses to failed states. In 1997-1998, he was a National Security Fellow at the John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University.

Current research projects include a book analyzing American grand strategy in the Middle East in the post-9/11 era. A second research project focuses on the implications of emerging technologies on strategic stability.

He has published numerous articles on international security and U.S. foreign and defense policy in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, International Security, the Los Angeles Times, Middle East Policy, the National Interest, the New Republic, the New York Times, Politico, the Washington Post, and the Washington Quarterly, as well as several reports for CNAS.

His previous research analyzed the causes and consequences of violent civil and ethnic conflict in developing countries, focusing particular attention on the demographic and natural resource dimensions of these conflicts. His book on the subject, States, Scarcity, and Civil Strife in the Developing World, was published by Princeton University Press in 2006, and related articles and chapters have appeared in International Security, the Journal of International Affairs, and various edited volumes.

Dr. Kahl received his B.A. in political science from the University of Michigan (1993) and his Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University (2000).
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [25] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 64
                                                    [user_firstname] => Jonathan
                                                    [user_lastname] => Kirshner
                                                    [nickname] => Jonathan Kirshner
                                                    [user_nicename] => jonathan-kirshner
                                                    [display_name] => Jonathan Kirshner
                                                    [user_email] => tttt@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:16:51
                                                    [user_description] => My research and teaching interests focus on International Relations, political economy (especially macroeconomics and money), and politics and film. I am currently pursuing projects on Classical Realism, the international political implications of the financial crisis and its aftermath, and the politics of mid-century cinema. My CV can be accessed here and links to many of my publications can be found here. Recent books include American Power after the Financial Crisis, and Hollywood’s Last Golden Age: Politics, Society and the Seventies Film in America. My first book, Currency and Coercion: The Political Economy of International Monetary Power explored how states manipulate international monetary relations to advance security-related goals. Another book, Appeasing Bankers: Financial Caution on the Road to War, illustrated how financial interests (such as banks) and international financial markets can shape and constrain states’ grand strategies and influence decisions about war and peace. Appeasing Bankers won the best book award from the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association. 

I am the editor of the volumes Globalization and National Security, and Money Orders: Ambiguous Economics, Ubiquitous Politics. (Published in 2003, Monetary Orders features several chapters that anticipate key issues that would become central to understanding the global financial crisis of 2007-8; my papers on Keynes and on macroeconomic politics more generally engage these themes as well.) With Eric Helleiner, I am the co-editor of the multi-disciplinary book series, “Cornell Studies in Money,” as well as the books The Great Wall of Money: Power and Politics in China’s International Monetary Relations, and The Future of the Dollar. 

I served as director of Cornell’s Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies from 2007 to 2015, and previously chaired the Economics and National Security Program at the Olin Institute of Strategic Studies at Harvard. From Cornell I have received the Provost’s Award for Distinguished Scholarship, and the Stephen and Margery Russell Distinguished Teaching Award.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [26] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 65
                                                    [user_firstname] => James
                                                    [user_lastname] => Kraska
                                                    [nickname] => James Kraska
                                                    [user_nicename] => james-kraska
                                                    [display_name] => James Kraska
                                                    [user_email] => uuuu@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:18:31
                                                    [user_description] => James Kraska is the Charles H. Stockton Professor of International Maritime Law in the Stockton Center for International Law at U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. In 2017 and 2018 he served as a Visiting Professor of Law and John Harvey Gregory Lecturer on World Organization at Harvard Law School, where he taught International Law of the Sea.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [27] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 92
                                                    [user_firstname] => Stephen D.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Krasner
                                                    [nickname] => Stephen Krasner
                                                    [user_nicename] => stephen-krasner
                                                    [display_name] => Stephen D. Krasner
                                                    [user_email] => ss2@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-23 00:05:31
                                                    [user_description] => Stephen Krasner is the Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations, the Senior Associate Dean for the Social Sciences, School of Humanities & Sciences, and the deputy director of FSI. A former director of CDDRL, Krasner is also an FSI senior fellow, and a fellow of the Hoover Institution.

From February 2005 to April 2007 he served as the Director of Policy Planning at the US State Department. While at the State Department, Krasner was a driving force behind foreign assistance reform designed to more effectively target American foreign aid. He was also involved in activities related to the promotion of good governance and democratic institutions around the world.

At CDDRL, Krasner was the coordinator of the Program on Sovereignty. His work has dealt primarily with sovereignty, American foreign policy, and the political determinants of international economic relations. Before coming to Stanford in 1981 he taught at Harvard University and UCLA. At Stanford, he was chair of the political science department from 1984 to 1991, and he served as the editor of International Organization from 1986 to 1992.

He has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences (1987-88) and at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (2000-2001). In 2002 he served as director for governance and development at the National Security Council. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

His major publications include Defending the National Interest: Raw Materials Investment and American Foreign Policy (1978), Structural Conflict: The Third World Against Global Liberalism (1985), and Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy (1999). Publications he has edited include International Regimes (1983), Exploration and Contestation in the Study of World Politics (co-editor, 1999),  Problematic Sovereignty: Contested Rules and Political Possibilities (2001), and Power, the State, and Sovereignty: Essays on International Relations (2009). He received a BA in history from Cornell University, an MA in international affairs from Columbia University and a PhD in political science from Harvard.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [28] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 66
                                                    [user_firstname] => Sarah
                                                    [user_lastname] => Kreps
                                                    [nickname] => Sarah Kreps
                                                    [user_nicename] => sarah-kreps
                                                    [display_name] => Sarah Kreps
                                                    [user_email] => vvvv@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:19:39
                                                    [user_description] => Sarah Kreps is an Associate Professor of Government and Adjunct Professor of Law at Cornell University. In 2017-2018, she is an Adjunct Scholar at the Modern War Institute (West Point). She is also a Faculty Fellow in the Milstein Program in Technology and Humanity at the Cornell Tech Campus in New York City.

Dr. Kreps is the author of four books, including, most recently, Taxing Wars: The American Way of War Finance and the Decline of Democracy (Oxford University Press, 2018), which deals with the causes and consequences of how advanced industrialized democracies such as the US, UK, and France pay for its wars.  She has also written two books on drones, including Drones: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2016) and Drone Warfare (Polity Press, 2014; with John Kaag).  Her first book was called Coalitions of Convenience: United States Military Interventions after the Cold War (Oxford University Press, 2011) and analyzed military interventions carried out over the last decade.

Beyond these books, her work has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, World Politics, Journal of Politics, International Security, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Security Studies, Journal of Strategic Studies, Political Science Quarterly, International Studies Perspectives, Foreign Policy Analysis, Polity, African Security Review, the Duke Journal of Comparative and International Law, the International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, Intelligence and National Security, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, and Polity. Her opinions have been featured in a series of media outlets including The Washington Post, International Herald Tribune, New York Times, Christian Science Monitor, USA Today, CNBC, and Reuters.

Dr. Kreps has held fellowships at the Council on Foreign Relations (and is a life member), Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and the University of Virginia’s Miller Center for Public Affairs. She has a BA from Harvard, MSc from Oxford, and PhD from Georgetown. Between 1999-2003, she served on active duty in the United States Air Force.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [29] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 67
                                                    [user_firstname] => Melvyn P.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Leffler
                                                    [nickname] => Melvyn P Leffler
                                                    [user_nicename] => melvyn-p-leffler
                                                    [display_name] => Melvyn P. Leffler
                                                    [user_email] => wwww@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:20:30
                                                    [user_description] => Melvyn P. Leffler is Edward Stettinius Professor of American History at The University of Virginia and Compton Visiting Professor at UVA’s Miller Center. He is the author of several books on the Cold War and on U.S. relations with Europe, including For the Soul of Mankind (2007), which won the George Louis Beer Prize from the American Historical Association, and A Preponderance of Power (1993), which won the Bancroft, Hoover, and Ferrell Prizes. In 2010, he and Odd Arne Westad co-edited the three volume Cambridge History of the Cold War. Along with Jeff Legro and Will Hitchcock, Leffler is co-editor of Shaper Nations: Strategies for a Changing World (Harvard University Press, 2016). Most recently, he published Safeguarding Democratic Nationalism: U.S. Foreign Policy and National Security, 1920-2015 (Princeton, 2017). He has served as president of the Society for the History of American Foreign Relations, Harmsworth Professor at Oxford University, and Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences at The University of Virginia. He is now writing about the foreign policies of the George W. Bush administration.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [30] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 68
                                                    [user_firstname] => Fredrik
                                                    [user_lastname] => Logevall
                                                    [nickname] => Fredrik Logevall
                                                    [user_nicename] => fredrik-logevall
                                                    [display_name] => Fredrik Logevall
                                                    [user_email] => yyyy@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:21:56
                                                    [user_description] => Fredrik Logevall is the Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School and Professor of History. A specialist on U.S. foreign relations history and modern international history, he was previously the Anbinder Professor of History at Cornell University, where he also served as vice provost and as the director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies. Before that he taught at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he co-founded the Center for Cold War Studies. 

Logevall is the author or editor of nine books, most recently Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam (Random House, 2012), which won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History and the 2013 Francis Parkman Prize, as well as the 2013 American Library in Paris Book Award and the 2013 Arthur Ross Book Award from the Council on Foreign Relations. His other recent works include America’s Cold War: The Politics of Insecurity (with Campbell Craig; Belknap/Harvard, 2009), and the college-level textbook A People and A Nation: A History of the United States (with Mary Beth Norton et al; 10th ed., Cengage, 2014). A native of Stockholm, Sweden, Logevall holds a PhD in History from Yale University. He is immediate past president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [31] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 69
                                                    [user_firstname] => Margaret
                                                    [user_lastname] => MacMillan
                                                    [nickname] => Margaret MacMillan
                                                    [user_nicename] => margaret-macmillan
                                                    [display_name] => Margaret MacMillan
                                                    [user_email] => zzzz@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:23:08
                                                    [user_description] => Margaret MacMillan is a Professor of History at the University of Toronto and the former Warden of St. Antony's College. Her books include Women of the Raj (1988, 2007); Paris 1919: Six Months that Changed the World (2001) for which she was the first woman to win the Samuel Johnson Prize; Nixon in China: Six Days that Changed the World; The Uses and Abuses of History (2008); and Extraordinary Canadians: Stephen Leacock (2009). Her most recent book is The War that Ended Peace. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and a Senior Fellow of Massey College, University of Toronto, Honorary Fellow of Trinity College, University of Toronto, Honorary Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University, and of St Hilda’s College and University of Oxford. Margaret is also a Trustee of the Central European University in Budapest, sits on the editorial board of International History and First World War Studies and is a Companion of Honour (UK). She is also a Trustee of the Rhodes Trust.

She has honorary degrees from the University of King’s College, the Royal Military College, The University of Western Ontario, Ryerson University, Toronto, Huron University College of the University of Western Ontario, the University of Calgary, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Bishop’s University and the University of Toronto. In 2006 Professor MacMillan was invested as an Officer of the Order of Canada and in 2015 became a Companion.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [32] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 43
                                                    [user_firstname] => Thomas G.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Mahnken
                                                    [nickname] => Thomas G Mahnken
                                                    [user_nicename] => thomas-g-mahnken
                                                    [display_name] => Thomas G. Mahnken
                                                    [user_email] => www@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:29:17
                                                    [user_description] => Dr. Thomas G. Mahnken is President and Chief Executive Officer of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments.

He is a Senior Research Professor at the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies at The Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and has served for over 20 years as an officer in the U.S. Navy Reserve, to include tours in Iraq and Kosovo.

He currently serves as a member of the Congressionally-mandated National Defense Strategy Commission and as a member of the Board of Visitors of Marine Corps University. His previous government career includes service as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Policy Planning from 2006–2009, where he helped craft the 2006 Quadrennial Defense Review and 2008 National Defense Strategy. He served on the staff of the 2014 National Defense Panel, 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review Independent Panel, and the Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction. He served in the Defense Department’s Office of Net Assessment and as a member of the Gulf War Air Power Survey. In 2009 he was awarded the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service and in 2016 the Department of the Navy Superior Civilian Service Medal.

Dr. Mahnken is the author of Strategy in Asia: The Past, Present and Future of Regional Security (Stanford University Press, 2014), Competitive Strategies for the 21st Century: Theory, History, and Practice (Stanford University Press, 2012), Technology and the American Way of War Since 1945 (Columbia University Press, 2008), and Uncovering Ways of War: U.S. Intelligence and Foreign Military Innovation, 1918–1941 (Cornell University Press, 2002), among other works.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [33] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 94
                                                    [user_firstname] => Rose
                                                    [user_lastname] => McDermott
                                                    [nickname] => Rose McDermott
                                                    [user_nicename] => rose-mcdermott
                                                    [display_name] => Rose McDermott
                                                    [user_email] => a@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-23 16:49:53
                                                    [user_description] => Rose McDermott is the David and Mariana Fisher University Professor of International Relations at Brown University and a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  She received her Ph.D.(Political Science) and M.A. (Experimental Social Psychology) from Stanford University and has taught at Cornell, UCSB  and Harvard. She has held fellowships at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies and the Women and Public Policy Program, all at Harvard University. She has been a fellow at the Stanford Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences twice. She is the author of four books, a co-editor of two additional volumes, and author of over two hundred academic articles across a wide variety of disciplines encompassing topics such as experimentation, emotion and decision making, and the biological and genetic bases of political behavior.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [34] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 70
                                                    [user_firstname] => Paul D.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Miller
                                                    [nickname] => Paul D Miller
                                                    [user_nicename] => paul-d-miller
                                                    [display_name] => Paul D. Miller
                                                    [user_email] => aa@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:23:58
                                                    [user_description] => Dr. Paul D. Miller is a Professor of the Practice of International Affairs at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. He serves as co-chair of the Global Politics and Security concentration in the MSFS program. He is also a non-resident Senior Fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security.

As a practitioner, Dr. Miller served as Director for Afghanistan and Pakistan on the National Security Council staff; worked as an intelligence analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency; and served as a military intelligence officer in the U.S. Army.

His most recent book, American Power and Liberal Order: A Conservative Internationalist Grand Strategy, was published by Georgetown University Press in 2016. In his first book, Armed State Building (Cornell University Press, 2013), Miller examined the history and strategy of stability operations. Miller taught at The University of Texas at Austin and the National Defense University and worked at the RAND Corporation prior to his arrival at Georgetown.

Miller blogs on foreign affairs at Elephants in the Room. His writing has also appeared in Foreign Affairs, Survival, Presidential Studies Quarterly, The Journal of Strategic Studies, Orbis, The American Interest, The National Interest, The World Affairs Journal, Small Wars and Insurgencies, and elsewhere. Miller holds a PhD in international relations and a BA in government from Georgetown University, and a master in public policy from Harvard University.

He is a contributing editor of the Texas National Security Review, a contributing editor of Providence: A Journal of Christianity and American Foreign Policy, a co-editor of the Naval Institute Press’s Series on the Future of Global Security, a research fellow at the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, a member of the advisory board for the Philos Project, and a member of the Texas Lyceum.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [35] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 71
                                                    [user_firstname] => Vipin
                                                    [user_lastname] => Narang
                                                    [nickname] => Vipin Narang
                                                    [user_nicename] => vipin-narang
                                                    [display_name] => Vipin Narang
                                                    [user_email] => bb@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:25:25
                                                    [user_description] => Vipin Narang is an Associate Professor of Political Science at MIT and a member of MIT’s Security Studies Program. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Government, Harvard University in May 2010, where he was awarded the Edward M. Chase Prize for the best dissertation in international relations. He holds a B.S. and M.S. in chemical engineering with distinction from Stanford University and an M. Phil with Distinction in international relations from Balliol College, Oxford University, where he studied on a Marshall Scholarship. He has been a fellow at Harvard University’s Olin Institute for Strategic Studies, a predoctoral fellow at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and a Stanton junior faculty fellow at Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Cooperation. His research interests include nuclear proliferation and strategy, South Asian security, and general security studies.

His first book Nuclear Strategy in the Modern Era (Princeton University Press, 2014) on the deterrence strategies of regional nuclear powers won the 2015 ISA International Security Studies Section Best Book Award. He is currently working on his second book, Strategies of Nuclear Proliferation (Princeton University Press, under contract), which explores how states pursue nuclear weapons.  His work has been published in several journals including International Security, Journal of Conflict Resolution, The Washington Quarterly,and International Organization.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [36] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 72
                                                    [user_firstname] => Janne E.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Nolan
                                                    [nickname] => Janne E Nolan
                                                    [user_nicename] => janne-e-nolan
                                                    [display_name] => Janne E Nolan
                                                    [user_email] => cc@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:26:35
                                                    [user_description] => Janne E. Nolan chairs the Nuclear Security Working Group and is a faculty member at the Elliott School of International Affairs of the George Washington University. She has had extensive experience in national security in government and the private sector, holding senior staff positions in the Department of State and the U.S. Senate and as a member of several blue ribbon commissions including the White House Presidential Advisory Board on U.S. Arms and Technology Policy (chairman), the National Defense Panel, the Department of State’s Accountability Review Board, the Congressionally-appointed Panel to Assess the Ballistic Missile Threat to the U.S., and the Secretary of Defense’s Policy Board.

Her private sector appointments include Professor of International Affairs and Deputy Director of the Ridgway Center at the University of Pittsburgh; Director and Research Professor at Georgetown University;  Director of Foreign Policy for The Century Foundation of New York, and Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution.  

Her eight books include Guardians of the Arsenal: The Politics of Nuclear Strategy; Trappings of Power: Ballistic Missiles in the Third World; An Elusive Consensus: Nuclear Weapons and American Security after the Cold War; and Tyranny of Consensus: Discourse and Dissent in American National Security as well as numerous articles in publications such as Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, The New Republic and the National Interest. 

She serves as an advisor or board member at the American Middle East Institute, the Arms Control Association, the Monterey Institute’s Non-Proliferation Review, the Hewlett Foundation Nuclear Advisory Committee, and the Center for Climate and Security. She is a member of the Cosmos Club and the Council on Foreign Relations.

The NSWG is chaired by Dr. Janne Nolan of the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University.

With membership drawn from a wide variety of professional backgrounds, the NSWG provides a forum for experts in different fields to share their perspectives and learn from one another. Through frequent dinner meetings and conferences, the NSWG enables the nation’s leading experts in international security and nuclear issues to share information and collaborate. The group conducts its activities in a not-for-attribution setting, enabling members and participants to freely express their thoughts and ideas.

By establishing a knowledge base of non-partisan foreign policy professionals, the NSWG serves as a resource for administration officials and members of Congress to utilize when real-time expertise is needed. Members of the group regularly meet with senior administration officials and members of both parties on Capitol Hill to help bridge the partisan divide and contribute to the formation and implementation of a nuclear security policy that serves the national interest of the United States.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [37] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 85
                                                    [user_firstname] => John
                                                    [user_lastname] => Owen
                                                    [nickname] => John Owen
                                                    [user_nicename] => john-owen
                                                    [display_name] => John Owen
                                                    [user_email] => qq@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:48:06
                                                    [user_description] => John Owen, A.B. (Duke), M.P.A. (Princeton), A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), Taylor Professor of Politics, is a political scientist who specializes in the study of international relations. He teaches in the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics at the University of Virginia, and is a Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture (IASC). He also is Editor-in-Chief of Security Studies, currently housed at the Miller Center of Public Affairs.

Owen's research concerns how ideological and cultural similarities and differences affect, and are affected by, international relations. He is interested in particular in the relationship between international hegemony or authority and ideological attractiveness; how transnational ideological networks carry and perpetuate both hegemonic and counter-hegemonic ideologies (e.g., Islamism; authoritarian capitalism) and how these can cause civil unrest, foreign intervention, and war; how political identities de-activate and re-activate; and the life cycles of regime types across regions (e.g., how did liberal democracy come to be dominant in so many places? how long will this dominance last? how might it end?).

His newest book is Confronting Political Islam: Six Lessons from the West's History (Princeton University Press, 2014). From transnational ideological struggles in the history of the West, the book draws lessons on the dynamics of conflict in the Muslim world today and what the outside world ought, and ought not, to do in response.

Confronting Political Islam builds upon Owen's preceding two books. The Clash of Ideas in World Politics: Transnational Networks, States, and Regime Change 1510-2010 (Princeton University Press, 2010) advances an explanation for forcible foreign regime promotion, a practice that has waxed and waned across the past five centuries. The book won the 2011 Joseph Lepgold Prize for Best Book on International Relations, awarded by the Mortara Center at Georgetown University. A Chinese language version is forthcoming from World Affairs Press in Beijing. An interview on WMRA public radio about Clash of Ideas is available here. Religion, the Enlightenment, and the New Global Order (Columbia University Press, 2011), co-edited with J. Judd Owen of Emory University and produced under the auspices of the IASC, considers whether the solutions to religious conflict proposed by the Western Enlightenment are feasible within, or appropriate to, non-Western religions.

Owen's first book, Liberal Peace, Liberal War: American Politics and International Security (Cornell University Press, 1997), and several of his articles and book chapters, advance an explanation for why liberal democracies seldom fight wars against one another. Owen also has published work on the Western canon and IR theory; the sources and prospects of American hegemony; the rationalist-constructivist divide in IR research; forcible domestic regime (e.g., democracy) promotion; and the ongoing Iraq war. His work has appeared in the European Journal of International Relations, International Organization, International Security, International Studies Quarterly, International Politics, Internationale Politik und Gesellschaft, International Relations, Perspectives on Politics, as well as the New York Times, Foreign Affairs, National Interest, and a number of edited volumes, most recently International Relations Theory and Regional Transformation, ed. T.V. Paul (Cambridge University Press, 2012).
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [38] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 118
                                                    [user_firstname] => Patrick
                                                    [user_lastname] => Porter
                                                    [nickname] => Patrick Porter
                                                    [user_nicename] => patrick-porter
                                                    [display_name] => Patrick Porter
                                                    [user_email] => a2@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2018-01-17 14:48:30
                                                    [user_description] => Professor Patrick Porter is the Chair of Strategic Studies at the University of Exeter, Academic Director of Strategy and Security Institute and Senior Associate Fellow at RUSI. Patrick’s two university press books earned critical acclaim, Military Orientalism: Eastern War through Western Eyes (2009) was listed on the UK Chief of Defence Staff's Reading List. His latest book, The Global Village Myth: Distance, War and the Limits of Power, is a major critique of assumptions about globalisation and insecurity.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [39] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 89
                                                    [user_firstname] => Thomas
                                                    [user_lastname] => Rid
                                                    [nickname] => Thomas Rid
                                                    [user_nicename] => thomas-rid
                                                    [display_name] => Thomas Rid
                                                    [user_email] => uu@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:52:51
                                                    [user_description] => Thomas Rid is Professor of Strategic Studies at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies.

Rid’s most recent book, Rise of the Machines (2016), tells the sweeping story of how cybernetics, a late-1940s theory of machines, came to incite anarchy and war (translated into Chinese, Russian, German, Japanese, and Turkish). His 2015 article “Attributing Cyber Attacks” was designed to explain, guide, and improve the identification of network breaches (Journal of Strategic Studies 2015). In 2013 he published the widely-read book Cyber War Will Not Take Place. Rid testified on information security in front of the US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence as well as in the German Bundestag and the UK Parliament.

From 2011 to 2016, Rid was a professor in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London. Between 2003 and 2010, he worked at major think tanks in Berlin, Paris, Jerusalem, and Washington, DC. Rid holds a PhD from Humboldt University in Berlin.

Thomas lives in Washington, DC.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [40] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 73
                                                    [user_firstname] => Joshua
                                                    [user_lastname] => Rovner
                                                    [nickname] => Joshua Rovner
                                                    [user_nicename] => joshua-rovner
                                                    [display_name] => Joshua Rovner
                                                    [user_email] => dd@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:28:24
                                                    [user_description] => Joshua Rovner, associate professor at the School of International Service, is a political scientist specializing in intelligence, strategy, and U.S. foreign policy. Rovner is the co-editor of Chaos in the Liberal Order: The Trump Presidency and International Politics in the 21st Century (Columbia University Press, forthcoming in 2018), which asks whether the rise of Donald Trump signals the end of the U.S.-led international order. Chaos in the Liberal Order brings together leading historians, political scientists, and policymakers to shed light on an extraordinary moment in world affairs. His first book was Fixing the Facts: National Security and the Politics of Intelligence (Cornell University Press, 2011), a pathbreaking study on the politicization of intelligence estimates. Fixing the Facts includes detailed histories of the Vietnam War, Cold War estimates of the Soviet Union, and the controversies surrounding the Iraq War. The book won the International Studies Association’s best book award for security studies, and the Edgar S. Furniss Book Award, presented by the Mershon Center at Ohio State University. In addition to writing many book chapters and policy pieces, Rovner has written commentary in The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, The Dallas Morning News, The National Interest, and Lawfare. He recently began a monthly column on intelligence and strategy for War on the Rocks. He has written journal articles in Security Studies, The Journal of Strategic Studies, Diplomacy & Statecraft, Intelligence and National Security, The International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, The Washington Quarterly, and Orbis. Beginning in 2018 he will become managing editor of H-Diplo’s International Security Studies Forum, and as deputy editor of The Journal of Strategic Studies. Prof. Rovner previously held the John Goodwin Tower Distinguished Chair in international Politics and National Security at Southern Methodist University, and as Associate Professor of Strategy & Policy at the U.S. Naval War College.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [41] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 108
                                                    [user_firstname] => Brent E.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Sasley
                                                    [nickname] => Brent Sasley
                                                    [user_nicename] => brent-sasley
                                                    [display_name] => Brent E. Sasley
                                                    [user_email] => a1@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-12-14 20:19:02
                                                    [user_description] => Brent Sasley is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Texas at Arlington, where he teaches Israeli and Middle East politics.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [42] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 74
                                                    [user_firstname] => Elizabeth N.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Saunders
                                                    [nickname] => Elizabeth N Saunders
                                                    [user_nicename] => elizabeth-n-saunders
                                                    [display_name] => Elizabeth N. Saunders
                                                    [user_email] => ee@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:29:18
                                                    [user_description] => Elizabeth N. Saunders is an Associate Professor in the School of Foreign Service and a core faculty member in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown. She is also a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a senior editor at the Washington Post’s political science blog, The Monkey Cage. Her research and teaching interests focus on international security and U.S. foreign policy, including the presidency and foreign policy, and the politics of using force. Her book, Leaders at War: How Presidents Shape Military Interventions, was published in 2011 by Cornell University Press and won the 2012 Jervis-Schroeder Best Book Award from APSA’s International History and Politics section. She has previously been a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations; a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; a postdoctoral fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University; a Brookings Institution Research Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies; and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. She holds an A.B. in physics and astronomy and astrophysics from Harvard College; an M.Phil. in international relations from the University of Cambridge; and a Ph.D. in political science from Yale University.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [43] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 75
                                                    [user_firstname] => Kori
                                                    [user_lastname] => Schake
                                                    [nickname] => Kori Schake
                                                    [user_nicename] => kori-schake
                                                    [display_name] => Kori Schake
                                                    [user_email] => ff@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:30:36
                                                    [user_description] => Kori Schake is deputy director-general of the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

Previously, Schake was a distinguished research fellow at the Hoover Institution. She has also served as deputy head of policy planning at the U.S. State Department and director for defense strategy and requirements on the National Security Council, along with positions in the U.S. Department of Defense.

Schake has also held the distinguished chair of international security studies at West Point and has served on the faculties of Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, the University of Maryland's School of Public Policy, and the National Defense University.

She is author of Safe Passage and, along with Secretary Jim Mattis, the editor of Warriors and Citizens: American Views of Our Military.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [44] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 76
                                                    [user_firstname] => Michael N.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Schmitt
                                                    [nickname] => Michael N Schmitt
                                                    [user_nicename] => michael-n-schmitt
                                                    [display_name] => Michael N. Schmitt
                                                    [user_email] => gg@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:34:40
                                                    [user_description] => Michael Schmitt is the Howard S. Levie Professor of Law and Armed Conflict at the U.S. Naval War College's Stockton Center for International Law. He is also the Francis Lieber Distinguished Scholar at the United States Military Academy’s Lieber Institute, Professor of Public International Law at the University of Exeter, and Senior Fellow at the NATO Cooperative Cyber Defense Centre of Excellence.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [45] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 77
                                                    [user_firstname] => Jacob N.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Shapiro
                                                    [nickname] => Jacob N Shapiro
                                                    [user_nicename] => jacob-n-shapiro
                                                    [display_name] => Jacob N. Shapiro
                                                    [user_email] => hh@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:36:18
                                                    [user_description] => Jacob N. Shapiro is Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project, a multi-university consortium that compiles and analyzes micro-level conflict data and other information on politically motivated violence in countries around the world. He studies conflict, economic and political development, and security policy. He is author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. His research has been published in broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan.

Shapiro received the 2016 Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40 or within 10 years of earning a Ph.D. who has made the most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), a Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Research in Pakistan (CERP), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Ph.D. Political Science, M.A. Economics, Stanford University. B.A. Political Science, University of Michigan. Prior to graduate school Shapiro served in the United States Navy.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [46] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 78
                                                    [user_firstname] => Sandesh
                                                    [user_lastname] => Sivakumaran
                                                    [nickname] => Sandesh Sivakumaran
                                                    [user_nicename] => sandesh-sivakumaran
                                                    [display_name] => Sandesh Sivakumaran
                                                    [user_email] => ii@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:38:45
                                                    [user_description] => Sandesh Sivakumaran is Professor of Public International Law. He is a member of the advisory board of Geneva Call and a member of the working group on non-state armed groups at the Centre of Competence on Humanitarian Negotiation. He has been a non-resident research scholar at the United States Naval War College Stockton Center for International Law and has held visiting fellowships at Melbourne Law School and New York University School of Law.

Sandesh has published on a variety of topics in public international law. He is the author of The Law of Non-International Armed Conflict (Oxford University Press, 2012), which was awarded the International Committee of the Red Cross Paul Reuter Prize, the American Society of International Law Francis Lieber Prize, and (jointly) the European Society of International Law Book Prize. He is the co-author of Oppenheim's International Law: United Nations (Oxford University Press, 2017)(with Dame Rosalyn Higgins, Philippa Webb, Dapo Akande and James Sloan), co-author of Cases and Materials on International Law (Sweet and Maxwell, 8 ed, 2015)(with David Harris), and co-editor of International Human Rights Law (Oxford University Press, 3 ed, 2017)(with Daniel Moeckli and Sangeeta Shah). He has published in leading journals including the European Journal of International Law, the International and Comparative Law Quarterly and the Human Rights Quarterly. His article on the courts of armed groups was awarded the Journal of International Criminal Justice Giorgio La Pira prize and the Antonio Cassese prize. His work has been cited by, among others, the UK, Netherlands, and Israeli Supreme Courts; the International Criminal Court; the International Law Commission; and UN commissions of inquiry.

Sandesh advises and acts as expert for a range of states, international organizations and non-governmental organizations. He has served as international legal advisor to the Appeals Chamber of the Special Court for Sierra Leone, conflict advisor to the Secretariat of the World Humanitarian Summit, and assisted negotiators of two peace processes on matters of international law. He is a member of the Reading Committee of the ICRC's Commentaries on the Geneva Conventions and Additional Protocols and was a member of the Core Group of Experts for the Oxford Guidance on the Law Relating to Humanitarian Relief Operations in Situations of Armed Conflict. Sandesh regularly trains diplomats, members of the armed forces, and UN entities on international law and the law of war. He is a member of the Bar of the State of New York.

Prior to entering academia, Sandesh's professional experience included: Fellow, previously Research Fellow, at the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge; Fellow of the International Bar Association and Associate Legal Officer to Judge Mohamed Shahabuddeen at the Appeals Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda; Law Clerk to Judges Dame Rosalyn Higgins and Peter Tomka at the International Court of Justice; and Intern for former President of Ireland and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Mary Robinson, at Realizing Rights: the Ethical Globalization Initiative.

Sandesh holds an MA and PhD from the University of Cambridge and an LLM from New York University School of Law where he was a Hauser Global Scholar.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [47] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 79
                                                    [user_firstname] => Sarah B.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Snyder
                                                    [nickname] => Sarah Snyder
                                                    [user_nicename] => sarah-snyder
                                                    [display_name] => Sarah Snyder
                                                    [user_email] => jj@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:40:36
                                                    [user_description] => Sarah B. Snyder is a historian of U.S. foreign relations who specializes in the history of the Cold War, human rights activism, and U.S. human rights policy.  She is the author of From Selma to Moscow: How Human Rights Activists Transformed U.S. Foreign Policy (Columbia University Press, 2018), which explains how transnational connections and 1960s-era social movements inspired Americans to advocate for a new approach to human rights.

Her first book, Human Rights Activism and the End of the Cold War: A Transnational History of the Helsinki Network (Cambridge University Press), analyzes the development of a transnational network devoted to human rights advocacy and its contributions to the end of the Cold War. The Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations awarded it the 2012 Stuart Bernath Book Prize by for best first book by an author and the 2012 Myrna F. Bernath Book Award for the best book written by a woman in the field in the previous two years.

In addition to authoring several chapters in edited collections, she has also published articles in Diplomatic History, Cold War History, Human Rights Quarterly, Diplomacy & Statecraft, Journal of Transatlantic Studies, European Journal of Human Rights, and Journal of American Studies.

She previously served as a Lecturer at University College London, a Cassius Marcellus Clay Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at Yale University, the Pierre Keller Post -Doctoral Fellow in Transatlantic Relations at the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies also at Yale, and as a professorial lecturer at Georgetown University.

She received her Ph.D. from Georgetown, a M.A. from University College London, and a B.A. with honors from Brown University.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [48] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 80
                                                    [user_firstname] => Bartholomew
                                                    [user_lastname] => Sparrow
                                                    [nickname] => Bartholomew Sparrow
                                                    [user_nicename] => bartholomew-sparrow
                                                    [display_name] => Bartholomew Sparrow
                                                    [user_email] => ll@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:41:39
                                                    [user_description] => Professor Sparrow studies American political development and, in particular, the conjunction between the American state and the international system. He teaches courses on American territorial expansion, American political institutions and processes (graduate), American politics and government (introductory), political communication, and the politics of food in America. He has received fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University, and Harry S. Truman Library Institute. He has been awarded the Leonard D. White and the Franklin L. Burdette/Pi Sigma Alpha prizes from the American Political Science Association. He has been recognized as one of the Texas Ten, 2018, an "annual list of inspiring professors, nominated by alumni and selected by the Alcalde magazine," and received the Department of Government's "2017 Graduate Student Outstanding Faculty Award for Distinguished Service to Graduate Students." 

Sparrow is the author of The Strategist: Brent Scowcroft and the Call of National Security, a biography of the former U.S. national security advisor.  He is previously the author of The Insular Cases and the Emergence of American Empire; Uncertain Guardians: The News Media as a Political Institution; and From the Outside In: World War II and the American State.  He is co-editor, with Sanford Levinson, of The Louisiana Purchase and American Expansion, 1803-1898 and, with Roderick Hart, of Politics, Discourse, and American Society: New Agendas.  He has chapters in several edited volumes, and his articles have appeared in the American Political Science Review, Political Communication, Diplomatic History, the International Journal of Public Opinion Research, and other journals.  He attended Dartmouth College, The University of Texas at Austin, and the University of Chicago.

He is currently writing about the political and constitutional legacies of the fact that over half of European Americans who arrived in the British North American colonies were unfree workers, bound to their masters for typically four to seven years. For the project he has received support from the American Antiquarian Society, Newberry Library, and College of Liberal Arts at The University of Texas at Austin.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [49] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 81
                                                    [user_firstname] => Monica
                                                    [user_lastname] => Duffy Toft
                                                    [nickname] => Monica Toft
                                                    [user_nicename] => monica-toft
                                                    [display_name] => Monica Duffy Toft
                                                    [user_email] => mm@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:42:46
                                                    [user_description] => Monica Duffy Toft is a Professor of International Politics and Director of the Center for Strategic Studies at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. Before joining Fletcher, Professor Monica Duffy Toft taught at Oxford University’s Blavatnik School of Government and Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. While at Harvard, she directed the Initiative on Religion in International Affairs and was the assistant director of the John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies. She was educated at the University of Chicago (MA and Ph.D. in political science) and at the University of California, Santa Barbara (BA in political science and Slavic languages and literature, summa cum laude). Prior to this, she spent four years in the United States Army as a Russian linguist. Monica’s areas of research include international security, ethnic and religious violence, civil wars and demography. Her most recent books include: "Securing the Peace," (Princeton, 2011); "Political Demography," (Oxford, 2012); and "God’s Century," (Norton, 2012). In addition she has published numerous scholarly articles and editorials on civil wars, territory and nationalism, demography, and religion in global politics. Monica can also be found on Twitter @monicaduffytoft. Affiliations: Monica is a research associate of the Blavatnik School of Government at the University of Oxford and at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. She is a supernumerary fellow at Brasenose College, University of Oxford, a Global Scholar of the Peace Research Institute Oslo, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Minorities at Risk Advisory Board and the Political Instability Task Force. In 2008 the Carnegie Foundation of New York named her a Carnegie Scholar for her research on religion and violence, in 2012 she was named a Fulbright scholar, and most recently served as the World Politics Fellow at Princeton University.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [50] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 97
                                                    [user_firstname] => Marc
                                                    [user_lastname] => Trachtenberg
                                                    [nickname] => Marc Trachtenberg
                                                    [user_nicename] => marc-trachtenberg
                                                    [display_name] => Marc Trachtenberg
                                                    [user_email] => e@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-23 23:04:56
                                                    [user_description] => Marc Trachtenberg studies national security strategy, diplomatic history, and international relations. He has been Fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the German Marshall Fund, and the SSRC/MacArthur Foundation. His award winning book, A Constructed Peace: The Making of the European Settlement, 1945-1963 (Princeton University Press, 1999), explores the profound impact of nuclear weapons on the conduct of international relations during the Cold War, making extensive use of newly opened documentary archives in Europe and the United States. History and Strategy (Princeton University Press, 1991) studies seminal events like the onset of World War I and the Cuban Missile Crisis to shed light on the role of force in international affairs. Professor Trachtenberg teaches courses on the history of international relations, international security, and historical research methods. His web site provides extensive resources for obtaining and interpreting documentary evidence about the Cold War.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [51] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 82
                                                    [user_firstname] => René
                                                    [user_lastname] => Värk
                                                    [nickname] => Rene Vark
                                                    [user_nicename] => rene-vark
                                                    [display_name] => René Värk
                                                    [user_email] => nn@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:45:02
                                                    [user_description] => 
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [52] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 83
                                                    [user_firstname] => Steven
                                                    [user_lastname] => Weber
                                                    [nickname] => Steven Weber
                                                    [user_nicename] => steven-weber
                                                    [display_name] => Steven Weber
                                                    [user_email] => oo@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:46:14
                                                    [user_description] => Steven Weber is a specialist in International Relations and International Political Economy with expertise in international and national security; the impact of technology on national systems of innovation, defense, and deterrence; and the political economy of knowledge-intensive industries particularly software and pharmaceuticals.

Trained in history and international development at Washington University, and medicine and political science at Stanford, Weber joined the Berkeley faculty in 1989. In 1992 he served as special consultant to the president of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in London. He has held academic fellowships with the Council on Foreign Relations and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and was Director of the Institute of International Studies from 2004 to 2009. He is Senior Policy Advisor with the Glover Park Group in Washington DC and actively advises government agencies, private multinational firms, and international non-governmental organizations on issues of foreign policy, risk analysis, strategy, and forecasting.

Weber’s major publications include The Success of Open Source, Cooperation and Discord in U.S.-Soviet Arms Control, and the edited book Globalization and the European Political Economy; and numerous articles and chapters in the areas of U.S. foreign policy, the political economy of trade and technology, politics of the post-Cold War world, and European integration. With colleagues  Bruce W. Jentleson at Duke and James Goldgeier, Dean of SIS at American University, Weber directs the New Era Foreign Policy Project funded principally by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.  Weber and Jentleson published in 2010 The End of Arrogance: America in the Global Competition of Ideas. His most recent book, edited with Nils Gilman of UC Berkeley and Jesse Goldhammer of Monitor Deloitte, is Deviant Globalization: Black Market Economy in the 21st Century.  He is currently writing Beyond the Globally Integrated Enterprise, a book that explains how economic geography is evolving and the consequences for multinational organizations in the post financial crisis world, and is directing a collaborative research effort on the employment effects of modern Information Technology.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [53] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 84
                                                    [user_firstname] => Amy
                                                    [user_lastname] => Zegart
                                                    [nickname] => Amy Zegart
                                                    [user_nicename] => amy-zegart
                                                    [display_name] => Amy Zegart
                                                    [user_email] => pp@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 23:46:59
                                                    [user_description] => Amy Zegart is a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute of International Studies (FSI), professor of political science (by courtesy) at Stanford University, and a contributing editor to The Atlantic. She is also the Davies Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, where she directs the Robert and Marion Oster National Security Affairs Fellows program. From 2013 to 2018, she served as co-director of the Freeman Spogli Institute’s Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) and founder and co-director of the Stanford Cyber Policy Program. She previously served as the chief academic officer of the Hoover Institution.

Her areas of expertise include cybersecurity, US intelligence and foreign policy, drone warfare, and political risk. An award-winning author, she has written four books. These include Political Risk: How Businesses and Organizations Can Anticipate Global Insecurity (2018) with Condoleezza Rice; Spying Blind: The CIA, the FBI, and Origins of 9/11 (2007), which won the National Academy of Public Administration’s Brownlow Book Award; Flawed by Design: The Evolution of the CIA, JCS, and NSC (1999); and Eyes on Spies: Congress and the US Intelligence Community (Hoover Institution Press, 2011). She has also published in leading academic journals, including International Security, the Journal of Strategic Studies, and Political Science Quarterly.

Zegart has been featured by the National Journal as one of the ten most influential experts in intelligence reform. She served on the Clinton administration’s National Security Council staff and as a foreign policy adviser to the Bush‑Cheney 2000 presidential campaign. She has also testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee; provided training to the US Marine Corps; and advised officials on intelligence, homeland security, and cybersecurity matters. Her commentary has been featured on national television networks, NPR, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and elsewhere. Before her academic career, Zegart spent three years as a McKinsey & Company management consultant advising leading companies on strategy and organizational effectiveness. She came to Stanford from UCLA, where she was a professor of public policy in the Luskin School of Public Affairs.  

She has won two UCLA teaching awards, the American Political Science Association’s Leonard D. White Dissertation Award, and grants from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Hewlett Foundation, the Smith Richardson Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.

Zegart’s public service includes serving on the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation, the FBI Intelligence Analysts Association National Advisory Board, the Los Angeles Police Department’s Counter‑Terrorism and Community Police Advisory Board, the National Academies of Science Panel to Improve Intelligence Analysis, and the Social Science Research Council Task Force on Securing Knowledge. A former Fulbright Scholar, she received an AB. in East Asian studies magna cum laude from Harvard University and an MA and PhD in political science from Stanford University. She serves on the board of directors of Kratos Defense & Security Solutions (KTOS). She is a native of Louisville, Kentucky.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                )

                            [exclude] => 
                            [user_role] => 
                        )

                    [2] => Array
                        (
                            [acf_fc_layout] => wgt_authors
                            [title] => Policy and Strategy Advisory Board
                            [wgt_type] => manual
                            [users] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 39
                                                    [user_firstname] => William
                                                    [user_lastname] => McRaven
                                                    [nickname] => William McRaven
                                                    [user_nicename] => william-mcraven
                                                    [display_name] => William McRaven
                                                    [user_email] => aa1@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:42:35
                                                    [user_description] => 
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [1] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 40
                                                    [user_firstname] => Elliott
                                                    [user_lastname] => Abrams
                                                    [nickname] => Elliott Abrams
                                                    [user_nicename] => elliott-abrams
                                                    [display_name] => Elliott Abrams
                                                    [user_email] => ttt@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:44:03
                                                    [user_description] => Elliott Abrams is senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) in Washington, DC. He served as deputy assistant to the president and deputy national security advisor in the administration of President George W. Bush, where he supervised U.S. policy in the Middle East for the White House.

Abrams was educated at Harvard College, the London School of Economics, and Harvard Law School. After serving on the staffs of Senators Henry M. Jackson and Daniel P. Moynihan, he was an assistant secretary of state in the Reagan administration and received the secretary of state's Distinguished Service Award from Secretary George P. Shultz. In 2012, the Washington Institute for Near East Policy gave him its Scholar-Statesman Award.

Abrams was president of the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, DC, from 1996 until joining the White House staff. He was a member of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom from 1999 to 2001 and chairman of the commission in the latter year, and served a second term as a member of the Commission in 2012-2014. From 2009 to 2016, Abrams was a member of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, which directs the activities of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. He is a member of the board of the National Endowment for Democracy, and teaches U.S. foreign policy at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.

Abrams joined the Bush administration in June 2001 as special assistant to the president and senior director of the National Security Council for democracy, human rights, and international organizations. From December 2002 to February 2005, he served as special assistant to the president and senior director of the National Security Council for Near East and North African affairs. He served as deputy assistant to the president and deputy national security advisor for global democracy strategy from February 2005 to January 2009, and in that capacity supervised both the Near East and North African affairs and the democracy, human rights, and international organizations directorates of the National Security Council.

Abrams is the author of five books: Undue Process, Security and Sacrifice, Faith or Fear: How Jews Can Survive in a Christian America, Tested by Zion: The Bush Administration and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, and most recently Realism and Democracy: American Foreign Policy After the Arab Spring. He is the editor of three more, Close Calls: Intervention, Terrorism, Missile Defense and "Just War" Today; Honor Among Nations: Intangible Interests and Foreign Policy; and The Influence of Faith: Religious Groups and U.S. Foreign Policy.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [2] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 151
                                                    [user_firstname] => Stephen
                                                    [user_lastname] => Biegun
                                                    [nickname] => Stephen.Biegun
                                                    [user_nicename] => stephen-biegun
                                                    [display_name] => Stephen Biegun
                                                    [user_email] => Stephen.Biegun@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2018-03-06 18:36:22
                                                    [user_description] => Stephen E. Biegun is an American businessman and diplomat serving as the United States Special Representative for North Korea. Biegun previously served as Vice President of International Governmental Affairs for the Ford Motor Company, and in government roles as a staffer on the National Security Council as well as national security adviser to Senator Bill Frist.

Biegun received his B.A. in Russian and Political Science from the University of Michigan in 1984. He was the in-country Director for the International Republican Institute in Moscow, Russia from 1992-1994. He is a member of the board of the U.S. Russia Foundation, the Moscow School of Political Studies, the U.S.–Russia Business Council, and Ford Sollers, Ford's joint venture operating in Russia.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [3] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 31
                                                    [user_firstname] => Brad
                                                    [user_lastname] => Carson
                                                    [nickname] => Brad Carson
                                                    [user_nicename] => brad-carson
                                                    [display_name] => Brad Carson
                                                    [user_email] => lll@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:11:59
                                                    [user_description] => Brad Carson has built a distinguished career in public service, law, and education. Before joining the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy at the University of Virginia, he was the acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel & Readiness at the Department of Defense. Carson oversaw the human resources, military readiness, education and training, and health care of the nearly 5 million servicemembers, civilian employees, and their dependents within the Department of Defense and managed an internal organization of 30,000 employees. For his work, the military historian Richard Kohn hailed Carson as the most consequential person to ever hold the job. Carson earlier served as the Under Secretary of the U.S. Army, where he managed the daily operations of the largest military service, and as General Counsel of the U.S. Army, where he managed the world-wide legal operations of the largest military service. A Rhodes Scholar, he is widely published and a noted authority on national security, energy policy, and American politics. From 2001-2005, he served two terms as a U.S. Congressman. Later, he was appointed to the faculty of the business and law schools at the University of Tulsa, where he directed the National Energy Policy Institute and taught academic courses on energy policy, property law, negotiation and game theory, globalization, and law and literature. Carson deployed as an intelligence officer during Operation Iraqi Freedom and was awarded the Bronze Star for his service.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [4] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 30
                                                    [user_firstname] => Derek
                                                    [user_lastname] => Chollet
                                                    [nickname] => Derek Chollet
                                                    [user_nicename] => derek-chollet
                                                    [display_name] => Derek Chollet
                                                    [user_email] => jjj@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:04:25
                                                    [user_description] => Derek Chollet is executive vice president and senior advisor for security and defense policy at The German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF). He is a contributing editor to Foreign Policy, where he coedits “Shadow Government,” and is a regular contributor to Defense One. He is also an advisor to Beacon Global Strategies, an adjunct senior research scholar at Columbia University’s Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, and a visiting fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perry World House.

From 2012-2015, Chollet was the U.S. assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs, where he managed U.S. defense policy toward Europe (including NATO), the Middle East, Africa, and the Western Hemisphere. In that role, he was a senior advisor to two secretaries of defense, Leon Panetta and Chuck Hagel.

Prior to joining the Pentagon, Chollet served at the White House as special assistant to the president and senior director for strategic planning on the National Security Council Staff. From 2009 to 2011, he was the principal deputy director of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s Policy Planning Staff. From November 2008 to January 2009, he was a member of the Obama-Biden presidential transition team.

During the Clinton Administration, Chollet served as chief speechwriter for UN Ambassador Richard Holbrooke, and as special adviser to Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott. From 2002 to 2004, Chollet was foreign policy adviser to U.S. Senator John Edwards (D-NC), both on his legislative staff and during the 2004 Kerry-Edwards presidential campaign.

Chollet has been a fellow at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), the Brookings Institution, the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), and the American Academy in Berlin. He has been a visiting scholar and adjunct professor at The George Washington University and an adjunct associate professor at Georgetown University.  He also assisted former Secretaries of State James A. Baker III and Warren Christopher, as well as Holbrooke and Talbott, with the research and writing of their memoirs.

Chollet is author, co-author, or co-editor of seven books on U.S. foreign policy, including The Long Game: How Obama Defied Washington and Redefined America’s Role in the World (PublicAffairs, 2016), America Between the Wars: From 11/9 to 9/11, co-authored with James Goldgeier (PublicAffairs, 2008), and The Unquiet American: Richard Holbrooke in the World, co-edited with Samantha Power (PublicAffairs, 2011), and his commentaries and reviews on U.S. foreign policy and politics have appeared in many other books and publications.

He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the U.S. Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service, the U.S. Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service, the U.S. State Department Superior Honor Award, the Latvia Minister of Defense Medal of Honorary Recognition, and the Lithuania Minister of Defense Medal of Merit.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [5] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 33
                                                    [user_firstname] => Ryan
                                                    [user_lastname] => Crocker
                                                    [nickname] => Ryan Crocker
                                                    [user_nicename] => ryan-crocker
                                                    [display_name] => Ryan Crocker
                                                    [user_email] => nnn@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:20:08
                                                    [user_description] => Ryan Crocker is currently an executive professor at Texas A&M University. From 2010–2011 and 2013–2016, he served as dean and executive professor at the George Bush School of Government & Public Service at Texas A&M where he was holder of the Edward and Howard Kruse Endowed Chair.

He retired from the Foreign Service in April 2009 after a career of more than 37 years but was recalled to active duty by President Obama to serve as U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan in 2011. He has served as U.S. Ambassador six times: Afghanistan (2011–2012), Iraq (2007–2009), Pakistan (2004–2007), Syria (1998–2001), Kuwait (1994–1997), and Lebanon (1990–1993).

Born in Spokane, Washington, he grew up in an Air Force family, attending schools in Morocco, Canada, and Turkey, as well as the United States. He received a B.A. in English in 1971 and an honorary doctor of laws degree in 2001 from Whitman College (Washington). He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Academy of Diplomacy, and the Association of American Ambassadors. In August 2013, he was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve on the Broadcasting Board of Governors, which oversees all U.S. government-supported civilian international media. He is also on the board of directors of Mercy Corps International.

Ambassador Crocker received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award, in 2009. In July 2012, he was named an Honorary Marine, the 75th civilian so honored since the founding of the Corps in 1775.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [6] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 35
                                                    [user_firstname] => Eric
                                                    [user_lastname] => Edelman
                                                    [nickname] => Eric Edelman
                                                    [user_nicename] => eric-edelman
                                                    [display_name] => Eric Edelman
                                                    [user_email] => ppp@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:26:44
                                                    [user_description] => Ambassador Eric S. Edelman retired as a career minister from the U.S. Foreign Service on May 1, 2009. He is currently a Roger Hertog Practitioner in Residence at Johns Hopkins SAIS and Counselor at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments.

Edelman has served in senior positions at the Departments of State and Defense as well as the White House where he led organizations providing analysis, strategy, policy development, security services, trade advocacy, public outreach, citizen services and congressional relations. As the undersecretary of defense for policy (August, 2005-January 2009) he oversaw strategy development as DoD’s senior policy official with global responsibility for bilateral defense relations, war plans, special operations forces, homeland defense, missile defense, nuclear weapons and arms control policies, counter-proliferation, counter-narcotics, counter-terrorism, arms sales, and defense trade controls.

He served as U.S. ambassador to the Republics of Finland and Turkey in the Clinton and Bush Administrations and was principal deputy assistant to the vice president for national security affairs. In other assignment he has been chief of staff to Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott, special assistant to Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Robert Kimmitt and special assistant to Secretary of State George Shultz. His other assignments include the State Department Operations Center, Prague, Moscow, and Tel Aviv, where he was a member of the U.S. Middle East delegation to the West Bank/Gaza autonomy talks.

He has been awarded the Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service, the Presidential Distinguished Service Award, and several Department of State Superior Honor Awards. In January 2011 he was awarded the Legion d’Honneur by the French Government.

He received a bachelor's degree in history and government from Cornell University and a doctorate in U.S. diplomatic history from Yale University.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [7] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 123
                                                    [user_firstname] => John
                                                    [user_lastname] => Hamre
                                                    [nickname] => John Hamre
                                                    [user_nicename] => john-hamre
                                                    [display_name] => John Hamre
                                                    [user_email] => 3e@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2018-01-31 15:48:17
                                                    [user_description] => John Hamre was elected president and CEO of CSIS in January 2000. Before joining CSIS, he served as the 26th U.S. deputy secretary of defense. Prior to holding that post, he was the under secretary of defense (comptroller) from 1993 to 1997. As comptroller, Dr. Hamre was the principal assistant to the secretary of defense for the preparation, presentation, and execution of the defense budget and management improvement programs. In 2007, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates appointed Dr. Hamre to serve as chairman of the Defense Policy Board, and he served in that capacity for four secretaries of defense.

Before serving in the Department of Defense, Dr. Hamre worked for 10 years as a professional staff member of the Senate Armed Services Committee. During that time, he was primarily responsible for the oversight and evaluation of procurement, research, and development programs, defense budget issues, and relations with the Senate Appropriations Committee. From 1978 to 1984, Dr. Hamre served in the Congressional Budget Office, where he became its deputy assistant director for national security and international affairs. In that position, he oversaw analysis and other support for committees in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. Dr. Hamre received his Ph.D., with distinction, in 1978 from the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Washington, D.C., where his studies focused on international politics and economics and U.S. foreign policy. In 1972, he received his B.A., with high distinction, from Augustana College in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, emphasizing political science and economics. The following year he studied as a Rockefeller fellow at the Harvard Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [8] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 29
                                                    [user_firstname] => Kathleen
                                                    [user_lastname] => Hicks
                                                    [nickname] => Kathleen Hicks
                                                    [user_nicename] => kathleen-hicks
                                                    [display_name] => Kathleen Hicks
                                                    [user_email] => iii@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 20:58:53
                                                    [user_description] => Kathleen Hicks is senior vice president, Henry A. Kissinger Chair, and director of the International Security Program at CSIS. With over fifty resident staff and an extensive network of non-resident affiliates, the International Security Program undertakes one of the most ambitious research and policy agendas in the security field. Dr. Hicks is a frequent writer and lecturer on geopolitics, national security, and defense matters. She served in the Obama Administration as the principal deputy under secretary of defense for policy and the deputy under secretary of defense for strategy, plans, and forces. She led the development of the 2012 Defense Strategic Guidance and the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review. She also oversaw Department of Defense contingency and theater campaign planning. From 2006 to 2009, Dr. Hicks was a senior fellow in CSIS’s international security program. Prior to that, she spent almost thirteen years as a career official in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, rising from Presidential Management Intern to the Senior Executive Service.

Dr. Hicks is concurrently the Donald Marron Scholar at the Kissinger Center for Global Affairs, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. She serves on the Boards of Advisors for the Truman Center and SoldierStrong and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Dr. Hicks served on the National Commission on the Future of the Army and the Commission on the National Defense Strategy. She is the recipient of distinguished service awards from three Secretaries of Defense and a Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the 2011 DOD Senior Professional Women’s Association Excellence in Leadership Award, and the National Capital-Area Political Science Association’s 2018 Walter Beach Award, for strengthening the relationship between the worlds of political science and public service. She holds a Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an M.P.A. from the University of Maryland, and an A.B. magna cum laude from Mount Holyoke College.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [9] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 37
                                                    [user_firstname] => James
                                                    [user_lastname] => Jeffrey
                                                    [nickname] => James Jeffrey
                                                    [user_nicename] => james-jeffrey
                                                    [display_name] => James Jeffrey
                                                    [user_email] => rrr@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:37:00
                                                    [user_description] => Ambassador James Franklin Jeffrey currently serves as the Secretary of State’s Special Representative for Syria Engagement and the Special Envoy to the Global Coalition To Defeat ISIS. He is a senior American diplomat with experience in political, security, and energy issues in the Middle East, Turkey, Germany, and the Balkans.

He has held senior assignments in Washington, DC, and abroad, including as Deputy National Security Advisor (2007–2008); United States Ambassador to Iraq (2010–2012); United States Ambassador to Turkey (2008–2010); and United States Ambassador to Albania (2002–2004). In 2010 Jeffrey was appointed to the highest rank in the U.S. Foreign Service, Career Ambassador. From 1969 to 1976, Jeffrey was a U.S. Army infantry officer, with service in Germany and Vietnam.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [10] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 36
                                                    [user_firstname] => Paul
                                                    [user_lastname] => Lettow
                                                    [nickname] => Paul Lettow
                                                    [user_nicename] => paul-lettow
                                                    [display_name] => Paul Lettow
                                                    [user_email] => qqq@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:34:27
                                                    [user_description] => Dr. Paul V. Lettow is a lawyer in the government regulation group in the Washington, D.C. office of Jones Day. From 2007 to 2009, he served as the Senior Director for Strategic Planning on the National Security Council staff at the White House. Previously, Dr. Lettow was Senior Advisor to the Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs from 2006 to 2007. He is the author of Strengthening the Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime (Council on Foreign Relations, 2010), and Ronald Reagan and His Quest to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (Random House, 2005). Dr. Lettow received a J.D. from Harvard Law School, a D.Phil. in international relations from Oxford University, and an A.B. in history, summa cum laude, from Princeton University. He is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [11] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 34
                                                    [user_firstname] => Michael
                                                    [user_lastname] => Lumpkin
                                                    [nickname] => Michael Lumpkin
                                                    [user_nicename] => michael-lumpkin
                                                    [display_name] => Michael Lumpkin
                                                    [user_email] => ooo@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:25:36
                                                    [user_description] => Michael D. Lumpkin joined the team at Leidos Health as Vice President of Human Performance an Behavioral Health in December 2017. He is a former American Naval Officer and businessman who served as the Special Envoy and Coordinator of the Global Engagement Center at the U.S. Department of State until January 2017. From 2013 until 2016, he was the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict. During that time, he also served as the acting Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, the third-highest civilian job at the United States Department of Defense.

Lumpkin is considered an experienced crisis manager and turnaround expert. Prior to his current role he was tasked to overhaul U.S. government efforts to disrupt extremist propaganda, he led the DoD response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa, efforts to locate and return Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl, and the reorganization of the military’s broken POW/MIA program.

As a Navy SEAL, Lumpkin served nine operational tours, one commanding a Team, in counter-insurgency and counter-narcotics operations around the world, including in Iraq, Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa, the Philippines, and Central and South America.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [12] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 46
                                                    [user_firstname] => William J.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Lynn
                                                    [nickname] => William J Lynn
                                                    [user_nicename] => william-j-lynn
                                                    [display_name] => William J. Lynn
                                                    [user_email] => aaaa@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:32:56
                                                    [user_description] => William J. Lynn III is the Chief Executive Officer of Leonardo DRS. Leonardo is a European-based defense and aerospace conglomerate and DRS is its largest U.S. subsidiary with about $2 billion in revenue.

Mr. Lynn has had an extensive career in national security, both in government and in industry. In government, he has served two Presidents, five Secretaries of Defense and as an aide to Senator Edward Kennedy. In industry, he has worked as a senior executive for Raytheon and now Leonardo/DRS.

Prior to joining Leonardo/DRS in January 2012, Mr. Lynn served as the 30th United States Deputy Secretary of Defense from 2009 to 2011. Serving under Secretaries Robert Gates and Leon Panetta, he managed three million personnel and oversaw an annual budget of $700 billion. He also personally led the Department's efforts in cyber security, space strategy and energy policy.

From 2002 to 2009, Mr. Lynn was Senior Vice President of Government Operations and Strategy at the Raytheon Company. In this position, he directed strategic planning, oversaw merger and acquisition activities and supervised government relations.

Previously, he served as the Chief Financial Officer and Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) from 1997 to 2001. From 1993 to 1997, he led strategic planning for DoD as Director of Program Analysis and Evaluation. Mr. Lynn worked for Senator Ted Kennedy as counsel to the Senate Armed Services Committee from 1987 to 1993.

Mr. Lynn is a member of the Boards of the USO, the Atlantic Council, Marshall Legacy Institute, National Defense Industrial Association and the Center for a New American Security (CNAS). He has been recognized for numerous professional and service contributions, including four DoD Distinguished Public Service medals and the Distinguished Civilian Service Award from the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

His publications include a 2010 path-breaking article in Foreign Affairs on cyber security (“Defending a New Domain: The Pentagon’s New Cyberstrategy”). He also co-authored a book, Toward A More Effective Defense, and has published numerous articles in various professional journals and newspapers.

A graduate of Dartmouth College, Mr. Lynn holds a law degree from Cornell Law School and a Master's degree from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. He is married with two children.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [13] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 48
                                                    [user_firstname] => Kelly
                                                    [user_lastname] => Magsamen
                                                    [nickname] => Kelly Magsamen
                                                    [user_nicename] => kelly-magsamen
                                                    [display_name] => Kelly Magsamen
                                                    [user_email] => cccc@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:36:00
                                                    [user_description] => Kelly Magsamen is the vice president for National Security and International Policy at American Progress. Previously, she was the principal deputy assistant secretary of defense for Asian and Pacific Security Affairs and also performed the duties of assistant secretary of defense, where she was responsible for defense and security policy for all of Asia and served as principal adviser to the secretary of defense. In these roles, Magsamen shaped Department of Defense policy and strategy in the South China Sea and was responsible for strengthening and modernizing U.S. alliances and partnerships in the region. She was also integral to the development of U.S. strategy and policy in Afghanistan and South Asia.

Prior to her tenure at the Pentagon, Magsamen served on the National Security Council staff for two presidents and four national security advisers. As special assistant to the president and senior director for strategic planning from 2012 to 2014, she was responsible for long-term strategic planning and helped craft the 2015 U.S. National Security Strategy. From 2011 to 2012, she served as senior adviser for Middle East reform. As director for Iran from 2008 to 2011, she was responsible for coordination of U.S. policy on Iran, including diplomatic, economic, defense, and intelligence efforts.

Magsamen started her government career at the Department of State, where she worked on Iraq policy in the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs from 2005 to 2007 and served as special assistant and chief of staff to the counselor from 2007 to 2008.

Magsamen received her bachelor’s degree in international relations from American University and her master’s degree in strategic studies from Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [14] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 38
                                                    [user_firstname] => David
                                                    [user_lastname] => Petraeus
                                                    [nickname] => David Petraeus
                                                    [user_nicename] => david-petraeus
                                                    [display_name] => David Petraeus
                                                    [user_email] => sss@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:40:11
                                                    [user_description] => David Petraeus is a retired United States Army general and public official. He served as Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from September 6, 2011, until his resignation on November 9, 2012. Prior to his assuming the directorship of the CIA, Petraeus served 37 years in the United States Army. His last assignments in the Army were as commander of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and Commander, U.S. Forces – Afghanistan (USFOR-A) from July 4, 2010, to July 18, 2011. His other four-star assignments include serving as the 10th Commander, U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) from October 13, 2008, to June 30, 2010, and as Commanding General, Multi-National Force – Iraq (MNF-I) from February 10, 2007, to September 16, 2008. As commander of MNF-I, Petraeus oversaw all coalition forces in Iraq.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [15] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 32
                                                    [user_firstname] => Dan
                                                    [user_lastname] => Runde
                                                    [nickname] => Dan Runde
                                                    [user_nicename] => dan-runde
                                                    [display_name] => Dan Runde
                                                    [user_email] => mmm@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:13:19
                                                    [user_description] => Daniel F. Runde is senior vice president, director of the Project on Prosperity and Development, and holds the William A. Schreyer Chair in Global Analysis at CSIS. His work centers on leveraging American soft power instruments and the central roles of the private sector and good governance in creating a more free and prosperous world. Previously, he led the Foundations Unit for the Department of Partnerships & Advisory Service Operations at the International Finance Corporation. His work facilitated and supported over $20 million in new funding through partnerships with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, Kauffman Foundation, and Visa International, among other global private and corporate foundations.

Earlier, Mr. Runde was director of the Office of Global Development Alliances at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). He led the initiative by providing training, networks, staff, funds, and advice to establish and strengthen alliances, while personally consulting to 15 USAID missions in Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa. His efforts leveraged $4.8 billion through 100 direct alliances and 300 others through training and technical assistance. Mr. Runde began his career in financial services at Alex. Brown & Sons, Inc., in Baltimore and worked for both CitiBank and BankBoston in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He received an M.P.P. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and holds a B.A., cum laude, from Dartmouth College.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [16] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 41
                                                    [user_firstname] => David
                                                    [user_lastname] => Shedd
                                                    [nickname] => David Shedd
                                                    [user_nicename] => david-shedd
                                                    [display_name] => David Shedd
                                                    [user_email] => uuu@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 21:45:21
                                                    [user_description] => Mr. Shedd was named Acting Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency in August 2014 following four years service as Deputy Director. Until January 2015 he led the Defense Intelligence Enterprise workforce comprised of more than 16,500 military and civilian employees worldwide. This workforce spans the Defense Intelligence Enterprise within the Department of Defense with an intelligence mission and/or function, plus all their stakeholders involved in creating, sustaining and enhancing mission capacity.

Mr. Shedd served from May 2007 to August 2010 as the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) Deputy Director for Policy, Plans, and Requirements, where he was responsible for overseeing the formulation and implementation of major Intelligence Community (IC) policies across the full spectrum of issues, from information sharing and IC authorities to analytic standards, among others. In particular, he led the review of Executive Order 12333, the foundational U.S. intelligence policy, which was revised by President George W. Bush in July 2008. Additionally, Mr. Shedd developed and implemented a National Intelligence Strategy, published in August 2009 for the IC and led all strategic planning efforts to determine future intelligence priorities for the Community and the Nation.

From May 2005 to April 2007, Mr. Shedd served as Chief of Staff and, later, Acting Director of the Intelligence Staff to the Director of National Intelligence. Prior to the creation of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Mr. Shedd held intelligence policy positions at the National Security Council (NSC) from February 2001 to May 2005. He served as the NSC’s Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Intelligence Programs and Reform. Mr. Shedd has been directly involved in the implementation of intelligence reform stemming from the 9/11 Commission report in July 2004, the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004, and the Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Commission’s report to the President in March 2005.

Between 1984 and 1993, Mr. Shedd served overseas in the U.S. Embassies in Costa Rica and Mexico. Mr. Shedd has also held a variety of senior management assignments at the Central Intelligence Agency, including Chief of Congressional Liaison.

Mr. Shedd is also on the Government Advisory Board of Dataminr, a social media “big data” company that broadly services the Federal Government.

Mr. Shedd holds a B.A. from Geneva College in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania and a M.A. from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in Latin American Studies. Mr. Shedd was born in Bolivia and grew up in Latin America.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
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                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 45
                                                    [user_firstname] => Kristen
                                                    [user_lastname] => Silverberg
                                                    [nickname] => Kristen Silverberg
                                                    [user_nicename] => kristen-silverberg
                                                    [display_name] => Kristen Silverberg
                                                    [user_email] => zzz@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:31:44
                                                    [user_description] => Ambassador Kristen Silverberg is a Managing Director at the Institute of International Finance, where she leads the Political Risk team. She also launched the IIF’s Innovations team, which focused on developments in digital finance.  She served in the George W. Bush Administration as U.S. Ambassador to the European Union from 2008 to 2009 and as Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs from 2005 to 2008.  Prior to her time at the State Department, she held senior positions at the White House, including Deputy Assistant to the President and Advisor to the Chief of Staff.  She previously served as Deputy Domestic Policy Advisor. 

Ambassador Silverberg served in 2003 in Baghdad, Iraq for which she received the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service.  She formerly practiced law at Williams and Connolly, LLP in Washington, DC and served as a law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and Judge David Sentelle of the U.S. Court of Appeals.  She attended Harvard College and the University of Texas School of Law, where she graduated with High Honors. 

Ambassador Silverberg serves on the Board of Directors of the CDC Foundation, the Board of Directors of the International Republican Institute, the Board of Directors of Vorbeck Materials, the Advisory Board of Beacon Global Strategies, the Advisory Board of the Texas National Security Review, and was recognized by the World Economic Forum in 2009 as a Young Global Leader.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [18] => Array
                                        (
                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 100
                                                    [user_firstname] => Michael
                                                    [user_lastname] => Singh
                                                    [nickname] => Michael Singh
                                                    [user_nicename] => michael-singh
                                                    [display_name] => Michael Singh
                                                    [user_email] => k@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-24 18:17:39
                                                    [user_description] => Michael Singh is the Lane-Swig Senior Fellow and managing director at The Washington Institute and a former senior director for Middle East affairs at the National Security Council.

During his tenure at the White House from 2005 to 2008, Mr. Singh was responsible for devising and coordinating U.S. national security policy toward the region stretching from Morocco to Iran, with a particular emphasis on Iran’s nuclear and regional activities, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Syria, and security cooperation in the broader Middle East. Previously, Mr. Singh served as special assistant to secretaries of state Condoleezza Rice and Colin Powell and at the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv.

Mr. Singh served as a Middle East advisor to the Romney presidential campaign from 2011-2012, and cochaired Mr. Romney’s State Department transition team in 2012. He served as an adjunct fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Security at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and as an economics instructor at Harvard College. Mr. Singh serves on the advisory boards of United Against Nuclear Iran and the Harvard International Review, and is a senior advisor at WestExec Advisors. He is also a member of the congressionally mandated Task Force on Extremism in Fragile States.

Mr. Singh has written extensively on the Middle East, broader US national security strategy, and the organization and management of the US national security apparatus. His writings have appeared in the Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, International Security, and elsewhere, and he has appeared as a commentator on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and other outlets.

As the Institute's managing director, Mr. Singh conducts policy research and participates in the public debate over the direction and content of U.S. Middle East policy. In addition, he works closely with Institute executive director Robert Satloff to strengthen the Institute's policy impact, develop new initiatives, and oversee its broader work.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

                                    [19] => Array
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                                            [user] => Array
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                                                    [ID] => 44
                                                    [user_firstname] => James G.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Stavridis
                                                    [nickname] => Jim Stavridis
                                                    [user_nicename] => jim-stavridis
                                                    [display_name] => James G. Stavridis
                                                    [user_email] => yyy@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:30:44
                                                    [user_description] => James G. Stavridis is a retired United States Navy admiral, currently an Operating Executive with The Carlyle Group and Chair of the Board of Counselors at McLarty Associates. In August 2018, he stepped down as the dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, a graduate school for international affairs. Stavridis serves as the chief international diplomacy and national security analyst for NBC News in New York. He is also chairman of the board of the U.S. Naval Institute and a Senior Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.

Stavridis graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1976. While in the Navy, Stavridis served as the commander, U.S. Southern Command(2006 to 2009) and commander, U.S. European Command and NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe (2009 to 2013), the first Navy officer to have held these positions. Stavridis earned a Ph.D and Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University in 1984, where he won the Gullion Prize.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

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                                            [user] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [ID] => 47
                                                    [user_firstname] => Christine E.
                                                    [user_lastname] => Wormuth
                                                    [nickname] => Christine E Wormuth
                                                    [user_nicename] => christine-e-wormuth
                                                    [display_name] => Christine E. Wormuth
                                                    [user_email] => bbbb@tnsr.org
                                                    [user_url] => 
                                                    [user_registered] => 2017-10-22 22:34:25
                                                    [user_description] => Christine Wormuth is director of the RAND International Security and Defense Policy Center. Wormuth is a frequent writer and speaker on foreign policy, national security, and homeland security issues. Prior to joining RAND, she was Under Secretary of Defense for Policy (USDP) at the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) from 2014 to 2016. In that role, she advised both Secretary Chuck Hagel and Secretary Ash Carter on the full range of regional and functional national security issues. As USDP she frequently represented DoD at the White House and spent considerable time on the counter-ISIS campaign, the rebalance to Asia, counterterrorism operations, and U.S. defense relations with countries in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.

From 2012 to 2014, Wormuth was Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for strategy, plans, and forces, and led the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review. She served as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Defense at the National Security Council (NSC) from December 2010 until August 2012, where she was the primary liaison from NSC to the Pentagon on defense issues. She holds an M.P.P. from the University of Maryland.
                                                    [user_avatar] => 
                                                )

                                        )

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