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Rediscovering Statecraft in a Changing Post-War Order

Rediscovering Statecraft in a Changing Post-War Order

If Washington doubles down on U.S. military and geopolitical predominance, it risks transforming the emerging competitive era into something far more confrontational and zero-sum than it needs to be. If it hopes to retain its position of leadership, the United…

Getting Out and About: Talking with Americans Beyond Washington About Their Place in the World

Getting Out and About: Talking with Americans Beyond Washington About Their Place in the World

A small team at CNAS is getting out of the Beltway “bubble” to talk to Americans about what role the United States should play on the international scene.

Marching Toward a U.S.-North Korea Summit: The Historical Case for Optimism, Pessimism, and Caution

Marching Toward a U.S.-North Korea Summit: The Historical Case for Optimism, Pessimism, and Caution

The history of denuclearization efforts on the Korean peninsula gives reason for pessimism, caution, and optimism. Attempting to critically engage that history can help the United States narrow uncertainty, prepare for a long diplomatic process should one…

Changing Course: Making the Case (Old and New) for American Seapower

Changing Course: Making the Case (Old and New) for American Seapower

In order to build the 355-ship Navy the United States needs, we will have to tell a new, and more compelling, story.

U.S. Engagement in the Western Hemisphere

U.S. Engagement in the Western Hemisphere

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson discusses the United States' enduring partnership with South America, Central America, North America, and the Caribbean.

The International Order and Nuclear Negotiations with Iran

The International Order and Nuclear Negotiations with Iran

The international order is not just an abstract concept, but rather is of concrete value to U.S. national security, as exemplified by America's policy toward Iran.

Too Much History: American Policy and East Asia in the Shadow of the Past

Too Much History: American Policy and East Asia in the Shadow of the Past

East Asian countries have a tendency to recall their historical grievances with rival nations, thus increasing the risk of eventual conflict. American policy toward East Asia, on the other hand, tends to have too short of a memory.

Now What? The American Citizen, World Order, and Building a New Foreign Policy Consensus

Now What? The American Citizen, World Order, and Building a New Foreign Policy Consensus

In order for the United States to adapt to current and future international challenges, it needs a foreign policy that can unite the American public and bring back bipartisan consensus on America’s role in the world.

Restoring the Vision: Overcoming Gridlock to Reassert Congress’s Role in Deliberating National Security

Restoring the Vision: Overcoming Gridlock to Reassert Congress’s Role in Deliberating National Security

In recent years, Congress’s role in shaping American national security strategy has diminished due to partisan gridlock from both parties. It’s time to reassert our status as a coequal branch of government and do our part to ensure our national security.